Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Apr 26, 2012 - Art - 395 pages
0 Reviews
In antiquity, Rome represented one of the world's great cultural capitals. The city constituted a collective repository for various commemoratives, cultural artefacts, and curiosities, not to mention plunder taken in war, and over its history became what we might call a 'museum city'. Ancient Rome as a Museum considers how cultural objects and memorabilia both from Rome and its empire came to reflect a specific Roman identity and, in some instances, to even construct or challenge Roman perceptions of power and of the self. In this volume, Rutledge argues that Roman cultural values and identity are indicated in part by what sort of materials Romans deemed worthy of display and how they chose to display, view, and preserve them. Grounded in the growing field of museum studies, this book includes a discussion on private acquisition of cultural property and asks how well the Roman community at large understood the meaning and history behind various objects and memorabilia. Of particular importance was the use of collections by a number of emperors in the further establishment of their legitimacy and authority. Through an examination of specific cultural objects, Rutledge questions how they came to reflect or even perpetuate Roman values and identity.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Museums and Muses
1
2 Collecting and Acquisition
31
3 Viewing Appreciating Understanding
79
Spoils War Commemoratives and Competition
123
Pietas Women and the Roman House
159
6 The Monster and the Map
193
7 Imperial Collections and the Narrative of the Princeps
221
8 Access and Upkeep
287
9 Epilogue
311
Bibliography
315
Index Locorum
339
General Index
359
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Steven H. Rutledge is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is author of Imperial Inquisitions: Prosecutors and Informants from Tiberius to Domitian (Routledge, 2001), and the author of numerous articles on Roman history and culture.

Bibliographic information