Martin Buber's Ontology: An Analysis of I and Thou

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Northwestern University Press, 1969 - Philosophy - 139 pages
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At the turn of the century Martin Buber arrived on the philosophic scene ... The path to his maturity was one long struggle with the problem of unity- in particular with the problem of the unity of spirit and life; and he saw the problem itself to be rooted in the supposition of the primacy of the subject-object relation, with subjects "over here," objects "over there," and their relation a matter of subjects "taking in" objects or, alternatively, constituting them. But Buber moved into a position which undercuts the subject-object dichotomy and initiates a second "Copernican revolution" in philosophical thought.
  

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Contents

The Context
3
The Form of I and Thou
27
The Basic Notions
34
History and the Self
73
The Eternal Thou
87
Bibliography
124
Index I
135
Copyright

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About the author (1969)

Wood, chair and professor of philosophy at the University of Dallas, is editor of American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.

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