The Principles of Psychology, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1890 - Psychology
27 Reviews
One of the greatest classics of modern Western literature and science and the source of the ripest thoughts of America's most important philosopher.
  

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Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Garrett Starr - Goodreads

I have always wanted this collection, but over the years I purchased other books instead. When our church moved into our current digs, this entire collection was hidden away in a back room and covered ... Read full review

Review: The Principles of Psychology Vol 2

User Review  - Jasmin Begic - Goodreads

Vol. 3? Hard to read but definitely worth it. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
12
III
81
IV
104
V
128
VI
145
VII
183
VIII
199
X
291
XI
402
XII
459
XIII
483
XIV
550
XV
605
XVI
643
Copyright

IX
224

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Page 291 - In its widest possible sense, however, a man's Self is the sum total of all that he CAN call his, not only his body and his psychic powers, but his clothes and his house, his wife and children, his ancestors and friends, his reputation and works, his lands and horses, and yacht and bank-account.
Page 121 - Habit is thus the enormous fly-wheel of society, its most precious conservative agent It alone is what keeps us all within the bounds of ordinance, and saves the children of fortune from the envious uprisings of the poor. It alone prevents the hardest and most repulsive walks of life from being deserted by those brought up to tread therein.
Page 122 - The great thing, then, in all education, is to make our nervous system our ally instead of our enemy. It is to fund and capitalize our acquisitions, and live at ease upon the interest of the fund. For this we must make automatic and habitual, as early as possible, as many useful actions as we can, and guard against the growing into ways that are likely to be disadvantageous to us, as we should guard against the plague.
Page 484 - For, wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy...
Page 549 - And everybody praised the Duke Who this great fight did win." " But what good came of it at last ? " Quoth little Peterkin. " Why, that I cannot tell," said he,
Page 255 - Every definite image in the mind is steeped and dyed in the free water that flows round it. With it goes the sense of its relations, near and remote, the dying echo of whence it came to us, the dawning sense of whither it is to lead.
Page 351 - THERE are some philosophers who imagine we are every moment intimately conscious of what we call our self; that we feel its existence and its continuance in existence; and are certain, beyond the evidence of a demonstration, both of its perfect identity and simplicity.
Page 309 - ... and a lady-killer, as well as a philosopher; a philanthropist, statesman, warrior, and African explorer, as well as a ' tone-poet ' and saint. But the thing is simply impossible. The millionaire's work would run counter to the saint's; the...
Page 148 - I cross the boundary of the experimental evidence, and discern In that matter which we, in our ignorance of its latent powers, and notwithstanding our professed reverence for its creator, have hitherto covered with opprobrium, the promise and potency of all terrestrial life.
Page 127 - Well! he may not count it, and a kind Heaven may not count it; but it is being counted none the less. Down among his nerve cells and fibers the molecules are counting it, registering and storing it up to be used against him when the next temptation comes. Nothing we ever do is, in strict scientific literalness, wiped out.

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