Economics for everyone: a short guide to the economics of capitalism

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Pluto Press, 2008 - Business & Economics - 350 pages
9 Reviews

Economics is too important to be left to economists. This brilliantly concise and readable book provides non-specialist readers with all the information they need to understand how capitalism works (and how it doesn't).

Jim Stanford's book is an antidote to the abstract and ideological way that economics is normally taught and reported. Key concepts such as finance, competition and wage labor are explored, and their importance to everyday life is revealed. Stanford answers questions such as "Do workers need capitalists?", "Why does capitalism harm the environment?", and "What really happens on the stock market?" He offers both a realistic assessment of capitalism's strengths, and a robust critique of its many failures.

This book will appeal to those working for a fairer world, and students of social sciences who need to engage with economics. The book is illustrated with humorous and educational cartoons by Tony Biddle, and is supported with a comprehensive set of web-based course materials for popular economics courses.

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Very readable study of corporate capitalist economics, with just the right amounts of historic reference and political jargon.

Review: Economics for Everyone: A Short Guide to the Economics of Capitalism

User Review  - Stuart Elliott - Goodreads

Jim Stanford, an economist in the research department of the Canadian Auto Workers, thinks economics is too important to be left to economists. So, he wrote this concise and readable book to provide ... Read full review

Contents

Why Study Economics?
1
Preliminaries
15
The Economy and Economics
17
Copyright

31 other sections not shown

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About the author (2008)

Jim Stanford is economist for the Canadian Auto Workers union, and economics columnist for the Globe and Mail newspaper.

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