An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Political Science
11 Reviews
Laid out in four books, "An Essay Concerning Human Understanding" is John Locke's exposition on the foundation of human knowledge and understanding. In the first and second books Locke begins by rejecting the notion of innate ideas proposed by Descartes and proposes instead that humans are born as blank slates and that all knowledge is derived from experience. The discussion is continued in books three and four with a discussion of the theory as it relates to language, intuition, mathematics, moral philosophy, natural philosophy, faith, and opinion. A compelling and important philosophical work, "An Essay Concerning Human Understanding" is a must read for all students of philosophy.
  

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Review: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

User Review  - Killer Rabbit - Goodreads

Impressive run, but takes a digger on final fence. Reading early philosophy books by people with mathematical training always feels like I'm watching a steeplechase. The writer canters away from the ... Read full review

Review: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

User Review  - Xandri Fiori - Goodreads

For a philosophical work, this is probably one of the least incisive, or at least unusually sloppy. Certainly Locke is intelligent but his terms shift, assume themselves (what is up with primary ... Read full review

Contents

I
5
V
6
VII
12
VIII
15
X
27
XII
40
XIII
52
XIV
61
L
236
LI
243
LII
249
LIV
251
LVI
254
LVIII
262
LIX
267
LXI
274

XV
63
XVII
64
XVIII
67
XIX
68
XX
71
XXI
78
XXII
83
XXIII
87
XXV
92
XXVI
95
XXVII
105
XXVIII
115
XXX
121
XXXI
124
XXXIII
133
XXXIV
136
XXXV
137
XXXVII
141
XXXVIII
173
XL
178
XLI
193
XLII
194
XLIV
197
XLV
200
XLVI
213
XLVII
221
XLVIII
228
XLIX
230
LXIII
296
LXIV
298
LXV
299
LXVI
309
LXVII
321
LXIX
332
LXXI
335
LXXII
341
LXXIV
356
LXXVI
364
LXXVIII
367
LXXX
375
LXXXI
387
LXXXII
391
LXXXIII
392
LXXXIV
400
LXXXV
406
LXXXVI
413
LXXXVII
414
LXXXVIII
415
LXXXIX
418
XCI
425
XCII
433
XCIII
439
XCIV
445
XCVI
454
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About the author (2004)

John Locke's works of political and social philosophy, written in the 17th century, have strongly influenced intellectuals ever since - including the founders of the United States of America. Born in 1632 in Wrington, England, Locke studied at Christ Church, Oxford, where he earned his B.A. and M.A. degrees in the late 1650's. He also studied medicine and earned a medical license. His studies led to an interest in contemporary philosophers influenced by science, such as Rene Descartes. Locke read widely among them while teaching at Christ Church over the next few years. In 1667, Locke became personal physician and adviser to Anthony Ashley Cooper, who later was appointed Earl of Shaftesbury. Through Shaftesbury's patronage, Locke earned some government posts and entered London's intellectual circles, all the while writing philosophy. He was one of the best-known European thinkers of his time when he died in 1704. In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), Locke established the philosophy of empiricism, which holds that the mind at birth is a blank tablet. Experience, Locke believed, would engrave itself upon the tablet as one grew. He felt humans should create theories according to experience and test them with experiments. This philosophy helped establish the scientific method. Locke codified the principals of liberalism in "Two Treatises of Government" (1690). He emphasized that the state must preserve its citizens' natural rights to life, liberty and property. When the state does not, Locke argued, citizens are justified in rebelling. His view of liberalism comprised limited government, featuring elected representation and legislative checks and balances. While a Christian, Locke believed in absolute separation of church and state, and he urged toleration of those whose religious views differed from the majorities.

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