A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: a revision of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives

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Longman, 2001 - Education - 352 pages
8 Reviews
B> This revision of Bloom's taxonomy is designed to help teachers understand and implement standards-based curriculums. Cognitive psychologists, curriculum specialists, teacher educators, and researchers have developed a two-dimensional framework, focusing on knowledge and cognitive processes. In combination, these two define what students are expected tolearn in school. Like no other text, it explores curriculums from three unique perspectives-cognitive psychologists (learning emphasis), curriculum specialists and teacher educators (C&I emphasis), and measurement and assessment experts (assessment emphasis). This "revisited" framework allows you to connect learning in all areas of curriculum. Educators, or others interested in Educational Psychology or Educational Methods for grades K-12.

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Review: A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives

User Review  - Adrian Buck - Goodreads

A necesssary introduction to joined-up teaching, this book has filled a gap in my own professional education. The gap between lesson planning, which I studied for my CELTA ,and syllabus planning ... Read full review

Review: A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives

User Review  - Rob - Goodreads

The original taxonomy was created by educational evaluators (the people who write tests for college courses). It was geared toward helping them share different type of test questions. I find it does ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
27
Section 3
38

12 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Lorin W. Anderson is Carolina Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of South Carolina, where he has served on the faculty for 27 years. He researches and publishes in the areas of classroom instruction and school learning, effective programs and practices for economically disadvantaged children and youth, the allocation and use of school time, and effective assessment.

Krathwohl is Hannah Hammond Professor of Education, Emeritus, School of Education, Syracuse University.

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