The Agricultural Museum, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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published, 1811 - Agriculture
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Page 252 - ... gravity of a soil should be known, as it affords an indication of the quantity of animal and vegetable matter it contains ; these substances being always most abundant in the lighter soils. The other physical properties of soils should likewise be examined before the analysis is made, as they denote, to a certain extent, their composition, and serve as guides in directing the experiments. Thus, siliceous soils are generally rough to the touch, and scratch glass when rubbed upon it...
Page 251 - ... another part siliceous ; and in this case, and in analogous cases, the portions different from each other should be separately submitted to experiment. Soils when collected, if they cannot be immediately examined, should be preserved in phials quite filled with them, and closed with ground glass stoppers. The quantity of soil most convenient for a perfect analysis is from two to four hundred grains. It should be collected in dry weather, and exposed to the atmosphere till it becomes dry to the...
Page 251 - The specific gravity of a soil, or the relation of its weight to that of water, may be ascertained by introducing into a phial, which will contain a known quantity of water, equal volumes of water and of soil, and this may be easily done by pouring in water till it is half full, and then adding the soil till the fluid rises to the mouth ; the difference between the weight of the soil and that of the water, will give the result...
Page 253 - The weights of the vegetable fibres or wood, and of the gravel and stones, should be separately noted down, and the nature of the last ascertained ; if calcareous, they will effervesce with acids; if siliceous they will be sufficiently hard to scratch glass ; and if of the common aluminous class of stones, they will be soft, easily cut with a knife, and incapable of effervescing with acids.
Page 271 - If any notable quantity of sulphate of lime (gypsum) existed in the soil, a white precipitate will gradually form in the fluid, and the weight of it will indicate the proportion. Phosphate of lime, if any exist, may be separated from the soil after the process for gypsum. . Muriatic acid must be digested upon the soil, in quantity more than sufficient to saturate the soluble earths; the solution must be evaporated, and water poured upon the solid matter. This fluid will dissolve the compounds of...
Page 274 - ... of cultivation ; and thus the plan of improvement would be founded upon accurate scientific principles. If the fertile soil contained a large quantity of sand, in proportion to the barren soil, the process of...
Page 350 - ... and preserve the liquor for use. The article to be cleaned should then be laid upon a linen cloth on a table, and having provided a clean sponge, dip...
Page 5 - ... laws, punishments, and the public exercise of religious duties. Thus connected together, it was found that a part only of society was sufficient to provide, by their manual labour, for the necessary subsistence of all; and leisure was given to others to cultivate the human mind, to invent useful arts, and to lay the foundations of science.
Page 251 - In cases when the general nature of the soil of a field is to be ascertained, specimens of it should be taken from different places, two or three inches below the surface, and examined as to the similarity of their properties. It sometimes happens, that upon plains the whole of the upper stratum of the land...
Page 251 - ... done by pouring in water till it is half full, and then adding the soil till the fluid rises to the mouth ; the difference between the weight of the soil and that of the water, will give the result, Thus if the bottle contains...

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