Life and Public Services of Thomas A. Hendricks: With Selected Speeches and Writings (Google eBook)

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Carlon and Hollenbeck, 1886 - 637 pages
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Page 557 - What constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud, with spires and turrets crowned; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No: MEN, high-minded MEN...
Page 551 - Whose lonely columns stand sublime, Flinging their shadows from on high, Like dials, which the wizard, Time, Had raised to count his ages by...
Page 104 - And be it resolved, That the governor be requested to forward a copy of these resolutions to each of our senators and representatives in congress.
Page 624 - The constitution of our country, in its most interesting and vital parts, is to be considered; the conflicting powers of the government of the Union and of its members, as marked in that constitution, are to be discussed; and an opinion given, which may essentially influence the great operations of the government. No tribunal can approach such a question without a deep sense of its importance, and of the awful responsibility involved in its decision.
Page 205 - ... exclusive power to determine for themselves whether slavery shall or shall not exist within their limits.
Page 224 - ... if the Cotton States shall become satisfied that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist on letting them go in peace.
Page 458 - To carry out the plan of colonization may involve the acquiring of territory, and also the appropriation of money beyond that to be expended in the territorial acquisition.
Page 158 - We arraign this bill as a gross violation of a sacred pledge; as a criminal betrayal of precious rights; as part and parcel of an atrocious plot to exclude from a vast unoccupied region immigrants from the Old World and free laborers from our own States, and convert it into a dreary region of despotism, inhabited by masters and slaves.
Page 270 - SENATOR. who shall inquire into the condition of the States which formed the so-called Confederate States of America, and report whether they or any of them are entitled to be represented in either House of Congress...
Page 549 - It shall be the duty of the general assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to form a penal code, (bunded on the principles of reformation, and not of vindictive justice: And also to provide one or more farms, to be an asylum for those persons who, by reason of age, infirmity, or other misfortunes, may have a claim upon the aid and beneficence of society...

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