Hungary, past and present: embracing its history from the Magyar conquest to the present time : with a sketch of Hungarian literature (Google eBook)

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Black, 1854 - Hungarian literature - 418 pages
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Page 313 - But when God commands to take the trumpet, and blow a dolorous or a jarring blast, it lies not in man's will what he shall say, or what he shall conceal.
Page 239 - The superiority of one country over another in a branch of production often arises only from having begun it sooner. There may be no inherent advantage on one part, or disadvantage on the other, but only a present superiority of acquired skill and experience.
Page 285 - ... zodiac yields, resembling two of those four which Ezekiel and St. John saw ; the one visaged like a lion, to express power, high authority, and indignation ; the other of countenance like a man, to cast derision and scorn upon perverse and fraudulent seducers : with these the invincible warrior, Zeal, shaking loosely the slack reins, drives over the heads of scarlet prelates, and such as are insolent to maintain traditions, bruising their stiff' necks under his flaming wheels.
Page 380 - ... other countries. There are cases like that which is now the subject of our discussion, of one Power having in the exercise of its own sovereign rights invited the assistance of another Power; and, however we may lament that circumstance, however we may be apprehensive that therefrom consequences of great danger and evil may flow, still we are not entitled to interpose in any manner that will commit this country to embark in those hostilities. All we can justly do is to take advantage of any opportunities...
Page 380 - ... that, so far as the courtesies of international intercourse may permit us to do, it is our duty, especially when our opinion is asked, as it has been on many occasions on which we have been blamed for giving it, to state our opinions, founded on the experience of this country an experience that might have been, and ought to have been, an example to less fortunate countries. At the same time, I am quite ready to admit that interference ought not to be carried to the extent of endangering our...
Page 381 - Much as her Majesty's Government regret this interference of Russia, the causes which have led to it, and the effects which it may produce, they nevertheless have not considered the occasion to be one which at present calls for any formal expression of the opinions of Great Britain on the matter...
Page 379 - I know there are many in this country who entertain the opinion that there are two objects which England ought peculiarly to aim at. One is to maintain peace ; the other is to count for something in the transactions of the world that it is not fitting that a country occupying such a proud position as England that a country having such various and extensive interests, should lock herself up in a simple regard to her own internal affairs, and should be a passive and mute spectator of everything...
Page 380 - I say, then, that it is our duty not to remain passive spectators of events that in their immediate consequences affect other countries, but which in their remote and certain consequences are sure to come back with disastrous effect upon us; that, so far as the courtesies of international intercourse may permit us to do, it is our duty, especially when our opinion is asked, as it has been...
Page 378 - Austrian empire itself it is, I say, devoutly to be wished that this great contest may be brought to a termination by some amicable treaty between the contending parties, which shall on the one hand satisfy the national feelings of the Hungarians, and on the other hand, not leave to Austria another and a larger Poland within her empire Her Majesty's Government have not in the present state of the matter, thought that any opportunity...
Page 348 - As eager for a plaudit as a realm, And just as fit for flirting as the helm ; A Calmuck beauty with a Cossack wit, And generous spirit, when...

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