Four Archetypes: (From Vol. 9, Part 1 of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung) (Google eBook)

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Princeton University Press, Jan 12, 2012 - Psychology - 200 pages
10 Reviews

One of Jung's most influential ideas has been his view, presented here, that primordial images, or archetypes, dwell deep within the unconscious of every human being. The essays in this volume gather together Jung's most important statements on the archetypes, beginning with the introduction of the concept in "Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious." In separate essays, he elaborates and explores the archetypes of the Mother and the Trickster, considers the psychological meaning of the myths of Rebirth, and contrasts the idea of Spirits seen in dreams to those recounted in fairy tales.

This paperback edition of Jung's classic work includes a new foreword by Sonu Shamdasani, Philemon Professor of Jung History at University College London.

  

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Review: Four Archetypes

User Review  - Duygu Ece - Goodreads

Even though my psychology background is enough, I find this book badly hard to read. While picking up this slim volume I was hoping to find something useful like introduction to archetypal pedagogy ... Read full review

Review: Four Archetypes

User Review  - Oliver Ho - Goodreads

I read this mainly for the essay on the trickster, and as a bit of a refresher on Jung because it had been a long time since I'd read a selection of his work. Unfortunately, this collection was far too dated, dense and dry (alliteration!) to enjoy or even to offer more than a passing interest. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
Psychological Aspects of the Mother Archetype
7
Concerning Rebirth
45
The Phenomenology of the Spirit in Fairytales
83
On the Psychology of the TricksterFigure
133
BIBLIOGRAPHY
153
INDEX
161
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About the author (2012)

Sonu Shamdasani is editor of "The Red Book" and Philemon Professor of Jung History at University College London.

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