Grammar, Language, and Society: Comtemporary Indian Contributions

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Rajendra Singh
SAGE Publications, 1997 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 366 pages
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Language has always occupied a central place in the intellectual landscape of India while the west has often sought inspiration, both conceptual and technical, from the grammarians and language philosophers of ancient India. Yet, ever since the colonial period, the study and practice of linguistics in India has been overshadowed by Anglo-American traditions. This volume brings together some of the most significant contemporary Indian contributions to the study of language. Taken together, these essays demonstrate that Indian linguistics have not only quietly continued their work but have also influenced a great deal of western thinking. The essays range from discussing minute details of phonotactic constraints to large-scale questions of language and justice. Among the topics covered are bi-space and multi lingualism, mother-tongue education, the societal roots of language, and the politics and ideology of language development. Overall, the volume opens up the possibility of forging a new synthesis in the study of language.

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Contents

Preface
9
Lexical Phonology
21
WellFormedness Conditions and Phonological Theory
53
Copyright

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