Russian Law: The End of the Soviet System and the Role of Law

Front Cover
Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1993 - Law - 486 pages
0 Reviews
This is the first treatise on Russia's new legal system, as it emerged from the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The first part of the book analyses in detail the political and economic origins of "perestroika," indispensable for understanding the basic parameters of the evolution of Russian law. In the following chapters all major legal subjects are discussed against the background of their Soviet past and as the result of the radical changes in the political, social and economic make-up of the country. The appendices include the texts of the U.S.S.R. and Russian Constitutions, the Agreement of Minsk, The Russian Federation Treaty, bibliographical sources, and extensive indices of Soviet and Russian legislation.
The book has been written for legal practitioners, comparative lawyers, and students of Russian law, but will also be of interest to a wider audience of political scientists, journalists, etc.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Totalitarianism
3
The Economic Structure
10
From Dream to MealTicket
17
Law in a Totalitarian System
26
The Multinational Soviet State
36
The Failure of Soviet Totalitarianism
42
Perestroika as a Learning Process
50
The Role of Law in Perestroika
65
Legislation of the USSR and Russia
191
Administration of Justice
201
From Plan to Market
229
The Social System
297
Constitution Fundamental Law of the USSR
321
Agreement on the Creation of a Commonwealth of Independent
379
Federative Treaty
445
USSR Legislation From the Perestroika Era
451

Soviet Law and the Soviet State From 1917 to Brezhnev
86
From the USSR to the Commonwealth
103
The Central State Agencies of the Soviet Union
143
The Organization of the Russian State
167
Russian Legislation After 27 October 1989
457
Bibliographical Note
473
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information