Walden: Or, Life in the Woods (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin, 1906 - Essays - 367 pages
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Review: Walden with Ralph Waldo Emerson's Essay on Thoreau

User Review  - Gary Varga - Goodreads

I cannot recommend enough the first chapter in this book; Economy. This book would have easily attained all five stars had it finished there. The rest of the book is equally well written but lacks the ... Read full review

Review: Walden with Ralph Waldo Emerson's Essay on Thoreau

User Review  - Joy Redington - Goodreads

The most intelligent, mind expanding, book out there. A real recipe for living simple, with a purpose. Read full review

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Page 101 - I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practise resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life...
Page 119 - There are probably words addressed to our condition exactly, which, if we could really hear and understand, would be more salutary than the morning or the spring to our lives, and possibly put a new aspect on the face of things for us.
Page 373 - And Jesus saith unto him, The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests ; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.
Page 58 - We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas ; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate.
Page 85 - I want the flower and fruit of a man; that some fragrance be wafted over from him to me, and some ripeness flavor our intercourse. His goodness must not be a partial and transitory act, but a constant superfluity, which costs him nothing and of which he is unconscious.
Page 358 - Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed and in such desperate enterprises ? If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
Page 3 - I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only.
Page 9 - It is never too late to give up our prejudices. No way of thinking or doing, however ancient, can be trusted without proof. What everybody echoes or in silence passes by as true to-day may turn out to be falsehood to-morrow, mere smoke of opinion, which some had trusted for a cloud that would sprinkle fertilising rain on their fields.
Page 260 - I could not get within half a dozen rods of him. Each time, when he came to the surface, turning his head this way and that, he coolly surveyed the water and the land, and apparently chose his course so that he might come up where there was the widest expanse of water and at the greatest distance from the .boat. It was surprising how quickly he made up his mind and put his resolve into execution. He led me at once to the widest part of the pond, and could not be driven from it.
Page 11 - The greater part of what my neighbors call good I believe in my soul to be bad, and if I repent of any thing, it is very likely to be my good behavior. What demon possessed me that I behaved so well?

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