The debate between pride and lowliness, by F. Thynn [or rather, wrongly ascr. to him. Signed F.T.]. Repr., with an intr. and notes by J.P. Collier (Google eBook)

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1841
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Page 35 - Yea, twoo or three thereto wyll scant suffice To judge of them and theyr indifference ; For secreete cause of favour maye arise, Which must be searched with great advertence, By such as have experience therein, And of adversitye have had theyr part : For who so beaten in the world hath bene, No further neede he take degree of art. With that they were content, and dyd agree To chose them tryers as I had thought meet. I asked them how many ? they sayde, three : In the name of God (quod I) so be it....
Page 67 - Of whiche neverthelesse we dayly see How many, and how coonning are the clarkes : I bidde ye not herein to credite me, Beleeve their writinges, and their noble warkes. But to my purpose whiche I have attained, For my defence and of my dreame also, There is no man alyve that here is blamed ; I know not such a man as weren tho, That by the breeche of cloth were chalenged, Nor I thinke never were, for to my wyt They were fantasticall, imagined ; Onely as in my dreame I dyd surmit. Wherefore no man thinke...
Page 14 - Ne can it hold as their forefathers dyd. Loe, what thou hast to bosten thee withall ! They lost the landes their fathers conquerid. Whereas thou sayest thy foote is worth my yard, That is untrue, save that for argument Thinges are to man as he dooth them regard, And other reason none to myne intent. Whereas thou sayest, that in thy presence I am of no regard ne countenaunce, That is a lye, saving your reverence, Though with the fooles it often so doo chaunce. With that the velvet breeches, as mee...
Page 83 - Nor yet by sleepe to nature so friendable, Though of all these we taken what we will ; Yea, rather for wee been unmeasurable, And use them, not for neede, but to fulfill A foule delite, and priden us therein : They been our snares and hasten our decay ; Thy just reward (O Lord) alias ! for sinne, When we by them are led forth of thy way. Graunt us therfore (O Lord) that we so use, Thy creatures as may stand with thy will, That for their sakes we do not thee refuse, Nor turne thy giftes and goodness...
Page 80 - And blesse his people and inheritance : To him be laud and praise world without end, And of all creatures obeyssance. THE BOOKE TO THE READER. If, gentle Reader, thou have found in me Thing which thy stomake hardly can digest, Here is discribed an Epythyme : Warme it and lappe it close vnto thy brest. It was compounded with great diligence, Of symples by an Apothecary, Both trustie and skilful in that science, And from these iiii. verses doth not vary. THE EPYTHYME. Who purposeth to liven vertuouse...
Page 4 - To make thee laugh, and recreate thy minde. If other matter it may yeelden thee. As morall counsel, whereby thou may lerne What thinges are good to folowe, what to flee, Then thanke me when we meeten at the terme. And pray God blesae our Queene and Countrey, And graunt her long to raigue and prosperous; And to as all after this journey In heaven with him selfe a dwelling house.
Page 19 - Piked he was and handsome in his weede : A faire blacke coate of cloth withouten sieve, And buttoned the shoulder round about ; Of xxs- a yard, as I beleeve, And layd upon with parchment lace without. His dublet was of sattin very fine, And it was cut and stitched very thick : Of silke it had a costly enterlyne ; His shirt had bands and ruffe of pure cambrick. His upper stockes of sylken grogerane, And to his hippes they sate...
Page ix - Spencer, whose heavenlie sprite Ecclipseth the sunne of former poetrie ; In whome the Muses harbor and delighte, Gracing thy verse with immortalitie, Crowning thy Fayrie Queene with deitie ; The famous Chaucer yealds his lawrell crowne Unto thy sugred penn for thy renowne. " Noe cankred envie cann thy fame deface, Nor eating time consume thy sugred vayne : Noe carping Zoilus cann thy verse disgrace, Nor scoffing Momus taunt the with disdaine, Since thy rare worke eternall praise doth gayne. Then,...
Page ii - COUNCIL THE SHAKESPEARE SOCIETY. THE MOST NOBLE THE MARQUESS OF NORMANBY. RT. HON. LORD BRAYBROOKE, FSA RT. HON. LORD F. EGERTON, MP RT. HON. THE EARL OF GLENGALL. RT. HON. EARL HOWE. RT. HON. LORD LEIGH. RT. HON. THE EARL OF POWIS. AMYOT, THOMAS, ESQ., FRS, TREAS. SA AYRTON, WILLIAM, ESQ., FRS, FSA BOTFIELD, BERIAH, ESQ., MP BRUCE, JOHN, ESQ., FSA COLLIER, J. PAYNE, ESQ., FSA, DIRECTOR. CRAIK, GEORGE L., ESQ. CUNNINGHAM, PETER, ESQ., TREASURER. DYCE, REV. ALEXANDER.
Page 29 - ... shall doo God high service, as I gesse, And to your countrey men no litle boote. The knight, as he that gentle was of cheere, Ne answeared his learning was but small ; But els herein his good wyll should appeere : Then afterward I up and tolde him all. Howe that he should not been alone him selve, Ne should above his learning have in charge ; For he should be the foreman of the twelve, And of their matter should enquire at large : And of such thinges as are in their knowledge, And of which no...

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