Writing the Radical Center: William Carlos Williams, John Dewey, and American Cultural Politics

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SUNY Press, Oct 11, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 202 pages
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Placing the philosopher John Dewey and the poet William Carlos Williams together—two important figures of twentieth-century American culture—this book examines the ambitions and failings of progressive liberal culture during the first half of the twentieth century. This book shows that, while their work ostensibly shares little in common, Williams and Dewey share the ambition to realize the radical potential of a democratic cultural politics. Including close readings of texts like Williams’s Spring and All, In the American Grain, and Paterson, and Dewey’s Individualism Old and New and Art as Experience, Beck offers an important contribution to current debates over the relationship between politics and cultural production.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
ARTICULATING DEMOCRACY A METAPHYSICAL MATHEMATICS OF THE INCOMMENSURABLE
9
AESTHETICS AS A FIELD OF ACTION
35
LEARNING DEMOCRACY
57
TACTUS ERUDITUS A REPLY WITH THE BARE HANDS
79
WHY I AM NOT A COMMUNIST
107
PATERSON BEAUTIFUL BUT EXPENSIVE
135
CONCLUSION
157
NOTES
171
BIBLIOGRAPHY
187
INDEX
195
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

John Beck is Lecturer in American Studies at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

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