The Mythology of the Wichita (Google eBook)

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George Amos Dorsey
The Carnegie Institution, 1904 - Wichita mythology - 351 pages
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Page 24 - In the times of the beginning there was no sun, no stars nor anything else as it is now. Time passed on. Man-never-known-on-earth was the only man that existed, and he it was who created all things. When the earth was created it was composed of land and water, but they were not yet separated. The land was floating on the water and darkness was everywhere. After the earth was formed, Man-never-known-on-earth made a woman whose name was Bright-shining-woman. After the man and woman were made they dreamed...
Page 24 - Man-never-known-on-earth made a woman whose name was Bright-shining-woman. After the man and woman were made they dreamed that things were made for them and when they awoke they had the things of which they had dreamed. Thus they received everything they needed. Still they were in darkness not knowing what was better than darkness." Here we have most emphatically an otiose deity. Apart from the creation of the earth and man he bestows, so to speak, only the potentiality of things. It is this first...
Page 99 - Ibid., p. 02. lives. The ball was finally knocked by After-birth -Boy over a small creek that had been selected as a goal. The Headless-Man's ball was black and his shinny stick was black. The two boys had a green ball and green sticks, green representing the spring of the year. Since that time the shinny game is played in the spring, under the power of the...
Page 24 - ... were made they dreamed that things were made for them, and when they woke they had the things of which they dreamed. Thus they received everything that they needed. The woman Was given an ear of corn, whose use she did not know, but it was revealed to her in her heart that this was to be her food, and that it was to be the food of the people who should exist in the future, so the Mother-Corn should be nursed and preserved in order to provide that food. Still they were in darkness, not knowing...
Page 24 - The man that creates things is about to improve our condition," he is informed later on. "Villages shall spring up and more people will exist, and you will have power to teach the people how to do things before unknown to them.
Page 26 - ... ball to the south goal and won. Then they changed goals, and the other side won. Then Darkness said they had played enough. Dr George A. Dorsey also relates that in the Wichita creation legend the first man, Having-Power-to-carry-Light, gave the men a ball smaller than the shinny ball. He told them this ball was to be used to amuse themselves with; that the men were to play together and the boys were to play together. Whenever a child was born, if it "was a boy this kind of ball was to be...
Page 24 - ... needs, ie, with the minor gods. The supreme being thus develops into what has been admirably described as an otiose deity, one resting on his laurels after the creation of the world and leaving it entirely to its own devices. Such an otiose deity is found, for instance, among the Wichita of Texas.
Page 309 - ... night after night to mourn at her grave. The spirit of a former friend appears and tells him how he may bring back the woman from the land of the dead. The spirit gives him four mud balls and instructs him how to use them. ' ' His friend touched his eyes and he found himself in another world, till with his friend. Around him, as far as his eye could see, he saw lodges. They entered the homes of the dead, and finally came to the place where the dance was, and there the dead man left his friend....
Page 25 - You have done the right thing." By shooting the deer that was half black and half white it was signified that there should be days and nights. The white deer went ahead, then the black deer, then the one that was wounded. The man of the grass lodge followed them. This meant that everything would move that the sun would rise, the stars would move, and that darkness and light should move on. So the man of the grass lodge became Star-that-is- Always-Moving (Kinniheguidikidahis). Having-Power-to-Carry-Light...
Page 6 - Next in rank to the chief was a leader, whose title was TheOne-Who-Locates, and whose duty it was to be constantly on the lookout for better village sites. . . . Next in rank, were the medicine-men, who were also priests of certain ceremonies, one of their number being known as the ' crier ' or ' announcer.' From the remaining inhabitants of the village were selected one or more known as ' servants'. Their duty was to do the bidding of the chiefs and of the medicine-men, especially in time of ceremonies....

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