The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 1, C.500-c.700

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Rosamond McKitterick, Paul Fouracre
Cambridge University Press, Dec 8, 2005 - History - 979 pages
2 Reviews
The first volume of The New Cambridge Medieval History covers the transitional period between the later Roman world and the early middle ages, c. 500 to c. 700. This was an era of developing consciousness and profound change in Europe, Byzantium and the Arab world, an era in which the foundations of medieval society were laid and to which many of our modern myths of national and religious identity can be traced. This book offers a comprehensive regional survey of the sixth and seventh centuries, from Ireland in the west to the rise of Islam in the Middle East, and from Scandinavia in the north to the Mediterranean south. It explores the key themes pinning together the history of this period, from kingship, trade and the church, to art, architecture and education. It represents both an invaluable conspectus of current scholarship and an expert introduction to the period.
  

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The New Cambridge medieval history

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The "Cambridge Medieval History" series, published between 1911 and 1936, has been regarded as the essential reference tool for anyone, historian or lay reader, with an interest in medieval history ... Read full review

Contents

VIII
13
IX
35
X
56
XI
93
XII
118
XIII
140
XIV
162
XV
193
XXIV
524
XXV
547
XXVI
571
XXVII
605
XXVIII
639
XXIX
660
XXX
675
XXXI
710

XVI
232
XVII
263
XVIII
291
XIX
317
XX
346
XXI
371
XXII
397
XXIII
426
XXXII
735
XXXIII
760
XXXIV
776
XXXV
785
XXXVI
805
XXXVII
911
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About the author (2005)

Paul Fouracre is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Manchester. His previous publications include Property and Power in the Early Middle Ages (0521522250) (co-edited with Wendy Davies) and The Age of Charles Martel (Addison-Wesley, 2000). He is co-editor of Early Medieval Europe and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

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