The poetical works, complete, of Oliver Goldsmith ... with some account of his life and literature: to which are prefixed several poetical tributes to his memory, by contemportary writers (Google eBook)

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Printed for Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1816 - Poetry - 149 pages
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Page 41 - Remembrance wakes with all her busy train, Swells at my breast, and turns the past to pain. In all my wand'rings round this world of care, In all my griefs and God has given my share I still had hopes, my latest hours to crown, Amidst these humble bowers to lay me down; To husband out life's taper at the close, And keep the flame from wasting by repose.
Page 24 - Stern o'er each bosom reason holds her state With daring aims irregularly great ; Pride in their port, defiance in their eye, I see the lords of human kind pass by...
Page 89 - For here forlorn and lost I tread With fainting steps and slow ; Where wilds, immeasurably spread, Seem length'ning as I go." " Forbear, my son," the hermit cries, ' ' To tempt the dangerous gloom ; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom. "Here to the houseless child of want My door is open still; And though my portion is but scant, I give it with good will.
Page 96 - Twas so for me that Edwin did, And so for him will I.
Page 49 - Yes! let the rich deride, the proud disdain, These simple blessings of the lowly train; To me more dear, congenial to my heart, One native charm, than all the gloss of art.
Page 42 - Who quits a world where strong temptations try, And, since 'tis hard to combat, learns to fly ! For him no wretches, born to work and weep, Explore the mine, or tempt the dangerous deep...
Page 46 - A man severe he was, and stern to view, I knew him well, and every truant knew; Well had the boding tremblers learned to trace The day's disasters in his morning face ; Full well they laugh'd with counterfeited glee, At all his jokes, for many a joke had he...
Page 74 - Though equal to all things, for all things unfit; Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit; For a patriot too cool; for a drudge disobedient; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemployed or in place, sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor.
Page 45 - Careless their merits or their faults to scan, His pity gave ere charity began. Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And...
Page 38 - How often have I blest the coming day, When toil remitting lent its turn to play, And all the village train, from labour free, Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree While many a pastime circled in the shade, The young contending as the old survey'd ; And many a gambol frolick'd o'er the ground, And sleights of art and feats of strength went round...

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