The Essays of Montaigne, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Reeves and Turner, 1877
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Page 255 - It is a nation, would I answer Plato, that hath no kinde of traffike, no knowledge of Letters, no intelligence of numbers, no name of magistrate...
Page 89 - JUSTUM et tenacem propositi virum Non civium ardor prava jubentium, Non vultus instantis tyranni Mente quatit solida, neque Auster, Dux inquieti turbidus Adriae, 5 Nee fulminantis magna manus Jovis : Si fractus illabatur orbis, * Impavidum ferient ruinae.
Page 69 - The thing in the world I am most afraid of is fear ; and with good reason, that passion alone, in the trouble of it, exceeding all other accidents.
Page 40 - If we did but discover the horror and ill consequences of it, we should pursue it with fire and sword, and more justly than other crimes. I see that parents commonly, and with indiscretion enough, correct their children for little innocent faults, and torment them for wanton...
Page 211 - As for what concerns myself, I was above six years of age before I understood either French or Perigordin, any more than Arabic; and without art, book, grammar, or precept, whipping, or the expense of a tear, I had, by that time, learned to speak as pure Latin as my master himself...
Page 237 - I had the happiness to enjoy the sweet society of this excellent man, 'tis nothing but smoke, an obscure and tedious night. From the day that I lost him, "Quem semper acerbum. Semper Honoratum (sic di, voluistis) habebo"u I have only led a languishing life ; and the very pleasures that present themselves to me, instead of administering anything of consolation, double my affliction for his loss. We were halves throughout, and to that degree, that methinks, by outliving him, I defraud him of his part.
Page 191 - How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Page 255 - ... but naturall, no manuring of lands, no use of wine, corne, or mettle. The very words that import lying, falshood, treason, dissimulations, covetousnes, envie, detraction, and pardon, were never heard of amongst them.
Page 74 - And also that every man should eat and drink, and enjoy the good of all his labour, it is the gift of God.
Page 229 - I feel it could no otherwise be expressed than by making answer, 'Because it was he; because it was I.' There is, beyond what I am able to say, I know not what inexplicable and inevitable power that brought on this union.

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