Economics: European Edition

Front Cover
Macmillan, Apr 6, 2007 - Business & Economics - 1088 pages
2 Reviews
Economics: European Edition is the ideal text for introductory economics, bringing together an international scope of real world examples and economic theory. The text is supported by a number of features to enhance student understanding as well as supplements to consolidate the learning process.
  

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Review: Economics

User Review  - Josh Meares - Goodreads

I haven't yet read this whole book, but I much prefer this textbook to Mankiw pr Perloff because Krugman owns up to the shortcomings of economics as a discipline up front and then consistently ... Read full review

Review: Economics

User Review  - Miguel - Goodreads

Reading this against my will. Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER 1 CHAPTEROPENING STORIES
1
and Trade
20
Graphs in Economics
41
Graphs That Depict Numerical Information
49
Supply and Demand
56
Beating the Traffic
62
Supply Demand and Equilibrium
68
Why do all sales and purchases in a market take place
70
A Tax Riot
509
Share?
535
Drugs on the Market
542
Whose Network Is It Anyway?
548
Supply and Demand part 11 Introduction to Macroeconomics
555
After the Revolution
580
Individuals and Markets part 12 The Economy in the Long
610
The Sources of LongRun Growth
616

Supply Demand and Controlied
77
Price and Quantity Controls
84
We Cant Afford to Visit
123
Consumer and Producer
138
Consumer Surplus Producer Surplus and the Gains
150
A Look Ahead
159
Behind the Supply Curve
163
Perfect Competition and
185
Was Malthus Right?
191
10? The Rational Consumer
211
Consumer Preferences
236
Factor Markets and
260
Indifference Curves and Consumer Choice
266
Substitutes
274
The Value of a Degree
289
Indifference Curve
316
13l Efficiency and Equity
322
Beyond Perfect
344
Forever?
350
Cities
369
Oligopoly
375
International Trade
402
Extending Market Boundaries
420
Uncertainty Risk and Private
446
Public Goods and Common
456
Externalities
470
Talking and Driving
474
Controlling Greenhouse Gases
481
A Look Ahead
487
Taxes Government Spending
491
for Nuclear Research
500
The Information Technology Paradox
622
Research Basic or Applied?
626
A Look Ahead
632
The Producer
637
Perfect Competition and the Supply Demand
664
Shocks in Practice
690
chapter 28 Income and Expenditure
698
Forecasting GDP
704
Bad Times in Buenos Aires
717
The Consumer appendix Deriving the Multiplier Algebraically
722
Fiscal Policy
723
Consumer Preferences and Consumer appendix Taxes and the Multiplier
751
A WaggonWay Through the Air
753
Interest in Interest Rates
777
The interest rate in the long run
800
J i Two Paths to Unemployment
806
Efficiency and Equity 322 chapter 33 Inflation Disinflation and Deflation
832
Euro Dilemmas
856
The Golden Age of Capital Flows
865
Burgernomics
873
28l Income and Expenditure
876
Macroeconomics
886
Challenges to Keynesian Economics
893
Business Cycle
900
Solutions to Check Your Understanding
1
Monopoly 344
19
Macroeconomic Data 19812004
41
Extending Market Boundaries Solutions to Check Your Understanding
57
Index
1
See inside back cover for chapters 2235
26
Copyright

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References to this book

About the author (2007)

PAUL KRUGMAN is Professor of Economics at Princeton University, where he regularly teaches the principles course. He received his BA from Yale and his PhD from MIT. Prior to his current position, he taught at Yale, Stanford, and MIT. He also spent a year on the staff of the Council of Economic Advisers in 1982-1983. His research is mainly in the area of international trade, where he is one of the founders of the "new trade theory," which focuses on increasing returns and imperfect competition. He also works in international finance, with a concentration in currency crises. In 1991, Krugman received the American Economic Association's John Bates Clark medal. In addition to his teaching and academic research, Krugman writes extensively for nontechnical audiences. Krugman is a regular op-ed columnist for the New York Times. His latest trade book is a best-selling collection of his Times articles entitled The Great Unraveling: Losing Our Way in the New Century. His earlier books, Peddling Prosperity and The Age of Diminished Expectations, have become modern classics.
ROBIN WELLS is Researcher in Economics at Princeton University, where she regularly teaches undergraduate courses. She received her BA from the University of Chicago and her PhD from the University of California at Berkeley; she then did postdoctoral work at MIT. She has taught at the University of Michigan, the University of Southampton (United Kingdom), Stanford, and MIT. Her teaching and research focus on the theory of organizations and incentives. She writes regularly for academic journals.
KATHRYN GRADDY is Professor of Applied Economics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, where she regularly teaches introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics to undergraduate students. She received her BA from Tulane University, her MBA from Columbia University, and her PhD from Princeton University. She came to Oxford in 1993 as a Junior Research Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford, and from 1995 to 1998 taught Managerial Economics at the London Business School and has therefore lectured in the UK for over 10 years. Her current research focuses on the economics of art auctions.

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