A Documentary History of American Industrial Society: Plantation and frontier (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Rogers Commons, Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, Eugene Allen Gilmore, Helen Laura Sumner, John Bertram Andrews
Arthur H. Clark Company, 1910 - Working class
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 370 - Society ;" and for the purposes aforesaid, and by the name aforesaid, shall have perpetual succession and a Common Seal, with full power and authority to alter, vary break, and renew the same at their discretion, and by the same name, to sue and be sued, implead and be impleaded, answer and be -answered unto...
Page 56 - Were it not then, that I am principled against selling negroes, as you would cattle at a market, I would not in twelve months from this date, be possessed of one as a slave.
Page 360 - In reference to another topic, he affirms " that the members of the same family of negroes are not so much scattered as are those of working men in Scotland, whose necessities compel them to separate at an age when the American slave is running about gathering health and strength...
Page 286 - ... the oaths appointed by an act of parliament made in the first year of the reign of our late royal father, to be taken instead of the oaths of allegiance and supremacy...
Page 57 - They were purchased for stock and breeding Negroes, and to any Planter who particularly wanted them for that purpose, they are a very choice and desirable gang.
Page 368 - The president and vicepresident of the Savannah Association of Mechanics;" and by the said name and style shall have perpetual succession of officers and members, and a common seal to use, and shall have power...
Page 154 - ... those who profess to be tailors, carpenters, or coopers, are, for the most part, careless, drunken, and dissipated, and never take pains sufficient to attain any dexterity in their trade. As to a free negro hiring himself out for plantation labor, no instance of such a thing was ever known in Jomaica ; and probably no price, however great, would be considered by them as a sufficient temptation.
Page 196 - Chatahouchee, a man and his wife, his son and wife, with a cart but no horse. The man had a belt over his shoulders and he drew in the shafts ; the son worked by traces tied to the end of the shafts and assisted his father to draw the cart : the son's wife rode in the cart, and the old woman was walking, carrying a rifle and driving a cow.
Page 169 - Country, that which has been clear'd is thicker in Woods than it was before the clearing. It is but in very few Places that the Plough is made use of, for in their first clearing they never grub up the Stumps, but cut the Trees down about two or three Foot from the Ground; so that all the Roots and Stumps being left, that Ground must be tended with Hoes, and by that time the Stumps are rotten, the Ground is worn out; and having fresh Land enough, of which they must clear some for Fire- Wood, they...
Page 44 - I have not acquired the writing short hand yet with any degree of swiftness but I am not always so for I give a very good Proof of the brightness of my Genius when I can distinguish well enough to Subscribe my Self with great Esteem, Sir, y* most obed humble Serv* ELIZA LUCAS.