A Statistical Sketch of the Island of Chusan with a Brief Note on the Geology of China (Google eBook)

Front Cover
P. Richardson, 1841 - Chou-shan Tao - 39 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 30 - In portions of the cliffs on the south and north coasts, the rocks are observed to assume a columnar structure, and dykes and masses of greenstone burst through the beds of clay-stone on various points, indurating and altering them to a considerable extent. On the west coast, the clay-stone porphyry assumes a slaty or la'minated structure, and appears to be quarried extensively both for use on the island and for exportation to the main land, affording excellent slabs for paving and for floors, and...
Page 36 - ... but rugged range of igneous rocks, much dislocated and broken up in various parts, but preserving the same general characters throughout. Further north as at Amoy, these rocks assume a trappean appearance, and the provinces of Chekeang and Keangsoo, as far north as the estuary of the Yangtsze keang, seem to be traversed by lofty but irregular ranges of hills and mountains of an igneous or perhaps volcanic nature, having a direction nearly due north and south. " The group of islands forming the...
Page 39 - IX , pilge 3(36. their existence, excepting that iron might perhaps be met with in the mountains. The gold and silver produced in China, are obtained, exclusively it would seem, from the western provinces bordering on Tibet, but upon this point no information as to the precise locality of the mines has been obtained. Veins of the metallic ores are however very unlikely to be found among the igneous rocks of the eastern coast, so far at least as they came under my observation.
Page 33 - Troops in the Eastern Colonies ; while, as a place of trade should it be ever practicable so far to overcome the prejudices and fears of the Chinese, as to allow of our retention of it with a fair prospect of the ports on the main being opened to us its value is undoubtedly great. A new system introduced into the towns and c STATISTICAL SKETCH, ETC.
Page 31 - Empire, and to become the home and abode of a portion of our fellow subjects, it cannot but be admitted that it presents features of attraction sufficient to render it in many essential respects as important a fief as has of late years been added to the Crown. The nature of its coasts and the peculiarity of its internal physical features render it a place easily defensible by a comparatively small garrison of disciplined troops against such forces as the Chinese could send to invade it.
Page 38 - ... east, and situated within a mile of the seacoast. Some junks were found laden with this coal, of which it is rather difficult to form a correct opinion from the small quantity brought away: I should however pronounce it anthracite of inferior quality. Some specimens of the rocks prevailing on the coast were brought away by the parties who visited this district, and prove that igneous rocks prevail there also. A slaty rock of the nature of shale was said to have been found in the water courses,...
Page 39 - ... this district, and prove that igneous rocks prevail there also. A slaty rock of the nature of shale was said to have been found in the water courses, but unfortunately no specimens were preserved. The mere existence of the rock would however imply the occurrence of a regular coal series, in which more of better quality may be found. " No metallic ores of any description were seen in any spot visited by the expedition, during the past year (1840), nor does the general appearance of the country...
Page 36 - ... ancient volcanic rocks. Our information now becomes imperfect as far as Shantung province, but from analogy it is reasonable to suppose that the same system of rocks continues along the coast, as far as the northeastern extremity of that province, which forms the southern arm of the bay of Cheihle.' The continuity of the same rocks seems evident from the geological character of the Ta-koa and other scattered islands in the narrow gorge at the entrance of the bay, indicating a connexion with the...
Page 33 - ... it by the Chinese. As a residence for Europeans it is undeniably most desirable ; with almost every article of luxury or necessity for the table readily procurable, with a climate allowing many absolutely cold months during the year, and the greater part of the remainder temperate and not oppressive, with the most lovely landscape meeting the eye wherever it rests, with the advantages of healthful exercise, including the great essential of sea bathing and many others that need not be enumerated,...
Page 30 - ... structure, and appears to be quarried extensively both for use on the island and for exportation to the main land, affording excellent slabs for paving and for floors, and good blocks for common building purposes. A coarse conglomerate is also to be seen, intervening between beds of the claystone, imbedding angular fragments of many descriptions of igneous rocks, and passing into a compact and workable porphyry, which is also quarried and made use of for pillars, blocks for corn mills, basement...

Bibliographic information