The Ladies' Companion (Google eBook)

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Bradbury and Evans, 1859 - Women's periodicals, English
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Page 14 - And unto the married I command, yet not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from her husband : but and if she depart, let her remain unmarried, or be reconciled to her husband ; and let not the husband put away his wife.
Page 89 - It sounds to him like her mother's voice, Singing in Paradise ! He needs must think of her once more, How in the grave she lies ; And with his hard rough hand he wipes A tear out of his eyes. Toiling, rejoicing, sorrowing, Onward through life he goes ; Each morning sees some task begin, Each evening sees it close ; Something attempted, something done, Has earned a night's repose.
Page 82 - Look not mournfully into the Past. It comes not back again. Wisely improve the Present. It is thine. Go forth to meet the shadowy Future, without fear, and with a manly heart.
Page 265 - How sweet the tuneful bells responsive peal ! As when, at opening morn, the fragrant breeze Breathes on the trembling sense of wan disease, So piercing to my heart their force I feel ! And hark ! with lessening cadence now they fall, And now along the white and level tide They fling their melancholy music wide, Bidding me many a tender thought recall Of...
Page 332 - The great and guilty love he bare the Queen, In battle with the love he bare his lord, Had marr'd his face, and mark'd it ere his time. Another sinning on such heights with one, The flower of all the west and all the world, Had been the sleeker for it : but in him His mood was often like a fiend, and rose And drove him into wastes and solitudes For agony, who was yet a living soul.
Page 331 - To whom my false voluptuous pride, that took Full easily all impressions from below, Would not look up, or half -despised the height To which I would not or I could not climb...
Page 46 - O woman in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light quivering aspen made; When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou!
Page 293 - Are not my days few? Cease then, and let me alone, that I may take comfort a little before I go whence I shall not return, even to the land of darkness and the shadow of death; a land of darkness, as darkness itself, and of the shadow of death, without any order and where the light is as darkness.
Page 331 - To me, methought, who waited with a crowd, There came a bark that, blowing forward, bore King Arthur, like a modern gentleman Of stateliest port; and all the people cried, ' Arthur is come again : he cannot die.
Page 213 - Beautiful it is to see and understand that no worth, known or unknown, can. die even in this earth. The work an unknown good man has done is like a vein of water flowing hidden underground, secretly making the ground green...

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