All That is Gone

Front Cover
Hyperion Books, Jan 28, 2004 - Fiction - 255 pages
6 Reviews
From one of the world's most acclaimed writers comes a collection of beautiful short stories based on the author's childhood.

Pramoedya Ananta Toer is a major figure in world literature, listed in John Major's rewrite of the famous Lifetime Reading Plan among the likes of James Baldwin, Bertolt Brecht, Graham Greene, and John Steinbeck as one of 100 authors everyone should read. A constant contender for the Nobel Prize, he recently won one of France's highest literary awards and has won the highest award in Asian letters.

In All That Is Gone, Pramoedya's semiautobiographical stories deal with life's major themes: birth and death, sexual knowledge and love, compassion and revenge. Some stories are written from a child's point of view, others from that of an adult. But all are written in a style that quickly wraps the reader up in this master storyteller's narrative web. This is the first time Pramoedya's short fiction has been widely available to the English reading public; its publication represents a significant addition to the canon of world literature in translation.

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Review: All That Is Gone

User Review  - Jim - Goodreads

This collection of semi-autobiographical short stories is set in a small rural town in Indonesia. The book begins with some coming-of-age stories of a young man, but most of the action takes place ... Read full review

Review: All That Is Gone

User Review  - Neil - Goodreads

The author excuses his book by writing: "You must be willing to tell stories about the loss of hope. People must be made to feel the suffering of others. As for contentment, contentment is but a sign ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Pramoedya Ananta Toer is the author of more than thirty books, including The Fugitive, The Mute's Soliloquy, and The Girl from the Coast, and is published in more than thirty countries. He has been called "Indonesia's Albert Camus" (San Francisco Chronicle). The Los Angeles Times compared him to James Baldwin and Dashiell Hammett. And he is listed in the updated edition of the classic Lifetime Reading Plan among the likes of Bertolt Brecht, Graham Greene, and John Steinbeck as one of 100 authors everyone should read. He has been profiled in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and other major publications around the world. He is the recipient of numerous international literary awards (such as France's Chevalier award and the highest award in Asian letters, the Magsaysay award) and freedom-of-speech awards (such as the PEN Freedom-to-Write award and the Hellman-Hammett award). He lives outside Jakarta.

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