Personal Financial Management (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Allen & Unwin, Mar 1, 2003 - Education - 262 pages
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Do you want to learn how to control your own financial destiny? This fully revised and updated edition of Personal Financial Management will teach you how.

The way you manage your money has a great deal to do with achieving your goals in life: the security of your own home, an enjoyable lifestyle, a good education for your children and a comfortable retirement. Personal Financial Management provides all the information you need to be your own financial manager, covering topics such as the financial planning process, borrowing money, insurance, investing, taxation and retirement. It describes skills and techniques that are easy to understand and simple to put into practice.

If you want to learn about how to manage your finances, and you are not sure where to begin, Personal Financial Management will get you started.

If you are faced with important financial decisions, Personal Financial Management will answer your questions and sharpen your ability to evaluate recommendations from financial advisors.

It is also an excellent resource for students studying financial planning.

John English, Barry Hicks, Sue Hrasky and Nikole Gyles are members of the Faculty of Commerce at the University of Tasmania in Hobart. e of students starting out on investment and finance studies.
  

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Contents

FINANCIAL GOALS
4
FINANCIAL PLANNING PROCESS
13
Internet site
18
Monthly budget
28
PART B BORROWING AND CREDIT
35
INSURANCE
81
Property
100
SPECIAL POLICIES
107
Investing in the stockmarket
147
The Australian Stock Exchange Internet site
149
Investing in residential property
165
Cumulative cost of renting versus buying
170
PART E TAXATION
179
Taxation planning
199
PART F RETIREMENT PLANNING
215
Superannuation planning
231

Effect of averaging
113
Life disability and health insurance
115
INVESTING
131
Economic clock
139
Entering retirement
245
Index
259
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 173 - A statement regarding who is responsible for the property from the date of the contract to the date the property is conveyed to you.
Page 48 - ... to ignore the problem in the hope that it will go away and prove temporary and insignificant.
Page 8 - ... a starting point in determining your current and long-term goals and how those goals may change in years to come. Household Type 1: Singles. This household type consists of adults who have never married, or who are widowed or divorced. It includes persons from age 18 to 54 who are considered to be self-supporting, even though they may be living with relatives or friends and sharing some household expenses. Income for this group may not be high, particularly for the younger members. Important...
Page 22 - ... requires you to estimate your available income for a particular period of time and decide how to allocate this income toward your expenses. A working budget can help you implement your money management plan. A well-planned budget does several things for you and your household. It can help you: T Prevent impulse spending.
Page 33 - NOW account is best for your needs. Answer these questions before making your decision: How safe is money in this particular institution and savings plan? Are there minimum-balance requirements? Are there penalties and fees for transactions? How convenient is it to make deposits and withdrawals?
Page 22 - Whether you rent or buy, or even if your house is paid for, a substantial part of your income will be used for housing.
Page 32 - ... require that your funds be unavailable for use for a certain period of time. You also may carry a greater risk of losing all or part of your money when investing. Investigate putting the bulk of your money in plans that pay high returns. Consider the risk involved in each plan before you invest.
Page 90 - You also have a legal duty to disclose every matter that you know, or could reasonably be expected to know, is relevant to the insurer's decision to accept the risk or the terms of acceptance, such as the amount of the premium or any conditions.
Page 91 - You have an insurable interest in your own life and the lives of your spouse and children.
Page 191 - This part of income tax is called capital gains tax (CGT). You show the capital gain or loss in your income tax return.

About the author (2003)

John English is the author of the hugely successful How to Organise and Operate a Small Business in Australia, now in its seventh edition, and The Australian Stockmarket Investor. Barry Hicks, Sue Hrasky and Nikole Gyles lecture in a range of financial and taxation areas and have published widely in the field.

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