A History of Navigation on Cypress Bayou and the Lakes (Google eBook)

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University of North Texas Press, 2001 - History - 821 pages
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Publisher Fact Sheet Bagur examines water transportation & the natural & socioeconomic factors that affected it in Northwest Louisiana, East Texas, & the Red River.
  

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Contents

Navigations Natural Setting
1
People of the Wilderness
30
The Great Raft
60
Shreves Accomplishment
91
The Advent of Steamboats 184044
117
The Birth of Jefferson
141
The Growth of Commerce 184555
159
Ports and Landings
188
Wartime Navigation 186165
447
Seasons of Celebration 186671
496
Triumph of the Railroads 187275
553
The Raft Destroyed
603
Twilight of the Steamboats
637
The Cypress Bayou and Waterway Project
672
In Search of a Landing
693
Steamboats at Work
707

The Route
273
Early Navigation Improvements
325
Wrecks
346
The Scope of Trade
379
The Prewar Years 185660
419
Steamboats by Year
755
Alphabetical Listing
777
Bibliographical Essay
789
Index
813
Copyright

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Page 32 - Two years ago they had the measles, of which several more of them died. They formerly lived on the south bank of the river, by the course of the river 375 miles higher up, at a beautiful prairie, which has a clear lake of good water in the middle of it, surrounded by a pleasant and fertile country, which had been the residence of their ancestors from time immemorial.
Page 59 - The game we live on is going farther off, and the white man is coming near to us; and is not our condition getting worse daily? Then why lament for the loss of that which yields us nothing but misery? Let us be wise then, and get all we can for it, and not wait till the white man steals it away, little by little, and then gives...
Page 42 - The first year they moved there the small pox got amongst them and destroyed nearly one half of them -, it was in the winter season, and they practised plunging into the creek on the first appearance of the eruption, and died in a few hours. Two years ago they had the measles, of which several more of them died.
Page 43 - Caddoques complain of the Choctaws encroaching upon their country ; call them lazy, thievish, &c. There has been a misunderstanding between them for several years, and small hunting parties kill one another when they meet. The Caddos raise corn, beans, pumpkins, &c. but the land on which they now live is prairie, of a white clay soil, very flat : their crops are subject to injury either by too wet or too dry a season. They have horses, but few of any other domestic...
Page 15 - Shrevcport had converted its bottom lands into reservoirs known as Fairy, Sodo, and Cross lakes. Before the work for its improvement between Shreveport, La., and Jefferson, Tex., commenced, navigation was difficult and dangerous by reason of bars and leaning timber in the bayou proper, and snags, stumps...
Page 44 - Caddos is hilly, not very rich ; growth a mixture of oak, hickory and pine, interspersed with prairies, which are very rich generally, and fit for cultivation. There are creeks and springs of good water frequent.

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