Ye gentlewoman's housewifery: containing a scarce, curious, valuable receipts for making ready all sorts of viands ... Also sundry salutary remedies of sovereign and approved efficacy and choice secrets on the improvement of female beauty (Google eBook)

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Dodd, Mead and company, 1896 - Cooking - 227 pages
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Page 173 - in the words of the Publican who made it " : " Keep grated Ginger and Nutmeg with a fine dried Lemon Peel rubbed together in a Mortar. To make a quart of Flip : Put the Ale on the Fire to warm, and beat up three or four Eggs with four ounces of moist Sugar, a teaspoonful of grated Nutmeg or Ginger, and a Quartern of good old Rum or Brandy. When the Ale is near to boil, put it into one pitcher, and the Rum and Eggs, etc., into another: turn it from one Pitcher to another till it is as smooth as...
Page 161 - ... up one-third, or perhaps a little less. Then take rasped or pounded ice, and fill up the tumbler. Epicures rub the lips of the tumbler with a piece of fresh pineapple, and the tumbler itself is very often incrusted outside with stalactites of ice. As the ice melts, you drink.
Page 11 - Take seven spoonfuls of spring-water; slice two onions of moderate size into a large saucer, and put in as much salt as you can hold at thrice betwixt your fore-finger and thumb, if large, and ierre it up.
Page 10 - ... ketchup rarely does, if not boiled a second time. Walnut Ketchup of the finest sort. Boil or simmer a gallon of the expressed juice of walnuts when they are tender, and skim it well ; then put in two pounds of anchovies, bones and liquor, ditto of shalots, one ounce of cloves, ditto of mace, ditto of pepper and one clove of garlic. Let all simmer till the shalots sink ; then put the liquor into a pan till cold ; bottle and share the spice with each.
Page 95 - You may leave out the Currants, for Change ; nor need you put in the perfumed Plums...
Page 114 - French roll, and over that whip your froth which you saved off the cream very well milled up, and lay at top as high as you can heap it; and as for the rim of the dish, set it round with fruit or sweetmeats, according to your fancy. This looks very pretty in the middle of a table with candles round it...
Page 212 - A gentlewoman being at table, abroad or at home, must observe to keep her body straight, and lean not by any means with her elbows, nor by raver.ous gesture discover a voracious appetite ; talk not when you have meat in your mouth ; and do not smack like a Pig, nor venture to eat Spoonmeat so hot that the tears stand in your Eyes, which is as unseemly as the Gentlewoman who pretended to have as little a Stomach as she had...
Page 50 - Oyfters, a little bit of thime, marjoram, parfley, fpinage, lemon-peel, fait, pepper, nutmeg, and mace, finely beaten, take your Veal caul, lay a layer of Bacon, and a layer of the Ingredients, roll it in the Veal caul, and either Roaft it or bake it. An hour will do either. When enough, cut in Slices and lay on a Difh with lemon.
Page 143 - ... a preserving-pan with as much water as will dissolve the sugar. Stir them well together over a very slow fire till the sugar begins to boil. Then stir in another pound of sugar beat fine, and keep stirring it till it grows thick. Then take it off the fire, and drop it in cakes upon earthen dishes. Set them in a warm place to dry, and they will be hard and brittle, and look white.
Page 121 - Keep it constantly stirring till it is thick enough to make into the form of a hedgehog. Then stick it full of blanched almonds, slit and stuck up like the bristles of a hedgehog, and then put it into a dish. Take a pint of cream, and the yolks of four eggs beat up, and sweeten it to your palate.

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