In My Father's House Are Many Mansions: Family and Community in Edgefield, South Carolina

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 1987 - History - 501 pages
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Burton traces the evolution of Edgefield County from the antebellum period through Reconstruction and beyond. From amassed information on every household in this large rural community, he tests the many generalizations about southern black and white famil
  

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In my Father's house are many mansions: family and community in Edgefield, South Carolina

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In his "total history'' approach Burton examines the development of a large ru ral community from the late antebellum period to the late 19th century. Home to great Southern families, Edgefield was ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER 1 Edgefield South Carolina
14
CHAPTER 2 Edgefield from the White Perspective
47
CHAPTER 3 The White Family and Antebellum Social Structure
104
CHAPTER 4 The Slave Family
148
CHAPTER 5 The Free AfroAmerican in Antebellum Edgefield
203
CHAPTER 6 The Culture of Postbellum AfroAmerican Family Life
225
CHAPTER 7 Black and White Postbellum Household and Family Structure
260
Conclusion
314
Appendix 1 Methodology
325
Appendix 2 Occupational Groupings
333
Notes
335
Bibliography
421
Index
463
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About the author (1987)

Orville Vernon Burton is professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His books include "A Gentleman and an Officer": A Military and Social History of James B. Griffin's Civil War.

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