Travels in Africa, Egypt, and Syria, from the Year 1792 to 1798 (Google eBook)

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T. Cadell junior and W. Davies, Strand; and T. N. Longman and O. Rees, Paternoster-Row., 1799 - Africa - 496 pages
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Page 368 - B much, much, it appeared they had a right to prefer: but at length Aubert du Bayet fent a young officer of the name of Bailli to the Pafha to demand redrefs in a tone perhaps rather too high.
Page 290 - ... he be ftronger than the thief. In buying and felling the parent glories in deceiving the fon, and the fon the parent; and God and the Prophet are hourly invocated, to give colour to the moft palpable frauds and falfehoods.
Page 43 - ... the tenet of Monothelism ; and on my expressing myself persuaded by his arguments, he seemed highly gratified. Indeed I met with, on their part, every mark of hospitality. I inquired for manuscripts, and saw in one of the convents several books in the Coptic, Syriac, and Arabic languages. Among these were an Arabo-Coptic Lexicon, the works of St. Gregory, and the Old and New Testament in Arabic. The Superior told me they had nearly eight hundred volumes, but positively refused to part with any...
Page 84 - ... extraordinary. The serpent most common at Kahira is of the viper class, and undoubtedly poisonous. If one of them enter a house, the charmer is sent for, who uses a certain form of words. I have seen three serpents enticed out of the cabin of a ship lying near the shore. The operator handled them, and then put them into a bag. At other times I have seen the serpents twist round the bodies of these psylli in all directions, without having had their fangs extracted or broken, and without doing...
Page 16 - On Sunday the 4th, having travelled about fix hours, we came to a well where was a copious fupply of water; and having given the camels time to drink, we left the coaft, and proceeded in a fouth-weft direction. From Alexandria to this well, the time employed in motion was feventy-five hours and an half, or nearly fo.
Page 20 - The other end is quite ruinous; but, judging from circumftances, it may be imagined that the building has never been much larger than it now is. There is no appearance of any other edifice having been attached to it, and the lefs fo as there are remains of fculpture on the exterior of the walls.
Page 209 - He was then mounted on a white mule, clothed with a fcarletbeniih, and had on his head a white turban ; which, however, together with part of his face, was covered with a thick muflin. On his feet were yellow boots, and the faddle on which he was feated was of crimfon velvet, without any ornament of gold or filver.
Page 43 - I conversed with, are scarcely anywhere to be found ; but the Superiors in both were in a certain degree intelligent. One of them, when I was admitted, was mending his shoes, and seemed to think little of theological controversies. The other attempted to prove to me the tenet of Monothelism ; and on my expressing myself persuaded by his arguments, he seemed highly gratified. Indeed I met with, on their part, every mark of hospitality. I inquired for manuscripts...
Page 366 - On the contrary, the large plain near Acre is left almoft a marfh, and marks of idle magnificence have been fubftituted for the ufeful cares of agriculture. A ftriking contrail arifes between his conduct and...
Page 287 - ... more the effecT: of continued tranfpiration, which, as there are no baths in the country, is a confideration of fome importance. The female flaves are dexterous in the application of it, and to undergo this operation is one of the refinements of African fenfuality. Their intervals of labour and reft are fixed by no eftablifhed rule, but governed by inclinatioa or perfonal convenience.

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