Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1889 - Science
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 401 - PREVENT us, O Lord, in all our doings with thy most gracious favour, and further us with thy continual help ; that in all our works begun, continued, and ended in thee, we may glorify thy holy name, and finally by thy mercy obtain everlasting life, through, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
Page 401 - DIRECT us, O LORD, in all our doings, with thy most gracious favor, and further us with thy continual help; that in all our works begun, continued, and ended in thee, we may glorify thy holy Name; and finally, by thy mercy, obtain everlasting life; through Jesus Christ our LORD. Amen.
Page 242 - I had not formerly sufficiently considered the existence of many structures which appear to be, as far as we can judge, neither beneficial nor injurious; and this I believe to be one of the greatest oversights as yet detected in my work.
Page 4 - Do not all fixed bodies, when heated beyond a certain degree, emit light and shine, and is not this emission performed by the vibrating motions of their parts?
Page xxvii - The objects of the Association are, by periodical and migratory meetings, to promote intercourse between those who are cultivating science In different parts of America, to give a stronger and more general impulse and more systematic direction to scientific research, and to procure for the labors of scientific men increased facilities and a wider usefulness.
Page 13 - ... observation, but, having a smattering of everything books could teach about every branch of knowledge, was judged by himself and by the public to be the fittest interpreter to it, of the physical science of this day. I mean Henry Brougham, the universal critic, the future Lord-chancellor of England, of whom it was observed, that, "if he had but known a little law, he would have known a little of everything.
Page 37 - Sec. 2. That said public park shall be under the exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior, whose duty it shall be, as soon as practicable, to make and publish such rules and regulations as he may deem necessary or proper for the care and management of the same. Such regulations shall provide for the preservation from injury or spoliation of all timber, mineral deposits, natural curiosities or wonders within said Park, and their retention in their natural condition.
Page 296 - In the light of the exposition just given, these implements will at once be recognized as among the most important archaeological discoveries yet made in America, ranking on a par with those of Dr. Abbott, at Trenton, NJ They show that in Ohio, as well as on the Atlantic coast, man was an inhabitant before the close of the glacial period.
Page 1 - MAN, being the servant and interpreter of Nature, can do and understand so much and so much only as he has observed in fact or in thought of the course of nature: beyond this he neither knows anything nor can do anything.
Page 52 - Vols. xxvm and xxix of the Memoirs of the French Academy. The method there adopted is so elegant that in Mr. Hill's opinion it cannot fail to become in the future the classic method of treating all problems of celestial mechanics. This theory, however, is limited to a determination of the inequalities in the motion of the moon due to the action of the sun on the hypothesis that the orbit of the earth is a pure ellipse. Mr. Hill has since determined the inequalities due to the ellipticity of the earth's...

Bibliographic information