Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800 : with a New Preface

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Cornell University Press, 1996 - History - 384 pages
5 Reviews
First published in 1980 and recently out of print, Liberty's Daughters is widely considered a landmark book on the history of American women and on the Revolution itself.
  

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Review: Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750 1800

User Review  - Mathew Powers - Goodreads

As I mentioned on my review for Linda Kerber's Women of the Republic, this book should be read with Kerber's together. They are both brilliant books. Any book can be seen to have a flaw or two, but they are both, overall, brilliant pieces of scholarship and excellent reads. Read full review

Review: Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750 1800

User Review  - AL Waddington - Goodreads

A fascinating look at the women who shaped our world today. A great read! Read full review

Contents

The Small Circle of Domestic Concerns
3
Residence of David Twining by Edward Hicks
10
At the Loom
16
English Role Reversal Prints
19
An Overseer Doing His Duty by Benjamin H Latrobe
31
Elizabeth Smith Shaw Peabody by Gilbert Stuart
37
Baby in a High Red Chair
88
Elizabeth Colden DeLancey by Matthew Pratt
106
The Edenton Ladies Tea Party
162
Necessity Taught Us
195
The Battle of Bunker Hill
197
Veluti in Speculum
207
Judith Sargent Stevens Murray by John Singleton Copley
237
Frontispiece Ladys Magazine 1792
253
Eliza Southgate Bowne
277
The Benefits of an Academy Education
279

Alice DeLancey Izard by Henry Spicer
107
Elizabeth Murray Smith Inman by John Singleton Copley
148
We Commenced Perfect Statesmen
155
A Revolutionary Broadside
158
Cymbeline a Needlework Picture from Mrs Rowsons Academy
286
A New Era of Female History
295
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About the author (1996)

Mary Beth Norton, the Mary Donlon Alger Professor of American History at Cornell University, received her B.A. from the University of Michigan and her Ph.D. from Harvard University. She teaches courses in the history of exploration, early America, women's history, Atlantic world, and American Revolution. Her many books have won prizes from the Society of American Historians, Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, and English-Speaking Union. Her book, FOUNDING MOTHERS & FATHERS (1996), was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. In 2011 her book SEPARATED BY THEIR SEX: WOMEN IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE IN THE COLONIAL ATLANTIC WORLD was published. She was Pitt Professor of American History at the University of Cambridge in 2005-2006. The Rockefeller Foundation, Guggenheim Foundation, and Huntington Library, among others, have awarded her fellowships. Professor Norton has served on the National Council for the Humanities and is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has appeared on Book TV, the History and Discovery Channels, PBS, and NBC as a commentator on Early American history.

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