Putnam's Magazine: Original Papers on Literature, Science, Art and National Interests, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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G. P. Putnam & Son., 1854
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Page 386 - Stuarts' throne; The bigots of the iron time Had called his harmless art a crime. A wandering harper, scorned and poor, He begged his bread from door to door, And tuned, to please a peasant's ear, The harp a king had loved to hear.
Page 449 - I am convinced, both by faith and experience, that to maintain one's self on this earth is not a hardship but a pastime, if we will live simply and wisely ; as the pursuits of the simpler nations are still the sports of the more artificial.
Page 450 - I found in myself, and still find, an instinct toward a higher, or, as it is named, spiritual life, as do most men, and another toward a primitive rank and savage one, and I reverence them both. I love the wild not less than the good.
Page 106 - A combination and a form, indeed, Where every god did seem to set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man: This was your husband.
Page 449 - industrious," and appear to love labor for its own sake, or perhaps because it keeps them out of worse mischief; to such I have at present nothing to say. Those who would not know what to do with more leisure than they now enjoy, I might advise to work twice as hard as they do, work till they pay for themselves, and get their free papers.
Page 528 - Here the free spirit of mankind at length, Throws its last fetters off; and who shall place A limit to the giant's unchained strength, Or curb his swiftness in the forward race...
Page 452 - I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself, than be crowded on a velvet cushion.
Page 451 - ... a house is, and are actually though needlessly poor all their lives because they think that they must have such a one as their neighbors have. As if one were to wear any sort of coat which the tailor might cut out for him, or, gradually leaving off palmleaf...
Page 383 - And sometime make the drink to bear no barm ; Mislead night-wanderers, laughing at their harm ? Those that Hobgoblin call you, and sweet Puck, You do their work, and they shall have good luck : Are not you he ? Puck.
Page 110 - Want as much more to turn it to its use; For wit and judgment often are at strife, Though meant each other's aid, like man and wife.

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