Introduction to nuclear engineering

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Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1975 - Technology & Engineering - 626 pages
2 Reviews
Offering the most current and complete introduction to nuclear engineering available, this book contains new information on French, Russian, and Japanese nuclear reactors. All units have been revised to reflect current standards. Includes discussions of new reactor types including the AP600, ABWR, and SBWR as well as an extensive section on non-US design reactors; the nuclear Navy and its impact on the development of nuclear energy; binding energy and such topics as the semi-empirical mass formula and elementary quantum mechanics; and solutions to the diffusion equation and a more general derivation of the point kinetics equation. Topics in reactor safety include a complete discussion of the Chernobyl accident and an updated section on TMI and the use of computer codes in safety analysis. For nuclear engineers.

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wonderful book for nuclear engineers .. Read full review

Contents

The Scope of Nuclear Engineering
1
Interaction of Radiation with Matter
42
Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Power
102
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About the author (1975)

Anthony Baratta" is currently a Professor of Nuclear Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University and Director of the Nuclear Safety Center. He received the B.A/B.S. degrees in physics/applied physics from Columbia University in 1968 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Brown University in 1970 and 1978, respectively. His research interests and contributions include reactor safety, reactor kinetics and physics, and the effects of radiation on materials. He has authored many scientific publications and made numerous presentations. He is an active member of the American Nuclear Society and has appeared on many network television and radio broadcasts as an authority on reactor accidents, including the accident at Three Mile Island.

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