Successful Television Writing

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Aug 5, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 224 pages
9 Reviews
The industry speaks out about SUCCESSFUL TELEVISION WRITING

"Where was this book when I was starting out? A fantastic, fun, informative guide to breaking into?and more importantly, staying in?the TV writing game from the guys who taught me how to play it."
--Terence Winter, Coexecutive Producer, The Sopranos

"Goldberg and Rabkin write not only with clarity and wit but also with the authority gleaned from their years of slogging through Hollywood?s trenches. Here is a must-read for new writers and established practitioners whose imagination could use a booster shot."
--Professor Richard Walter, Screenwriting Chairman, UCLA Department of Film and TV

"Not since William Goldman?s Adventures in the Screen Trade has there been a book this revealing, funny, and informative about The Industry. Reading this book is like having a good, long lunch with your two best friends in the TV business."
--Janet Evanovich

"With sharp wit and painful honesty, Goldberg and Rabkin offer the truest account yet of working in the TV business. Accept no substitutes!"
--Jeffrey B. Hodes and Nastaran Dibai, Coexecutive Producers, Third Rock from the Sun

"Should be required reading for all aspiring television writers."
--Howard Gordon, Executive Producer, 24 and The X-Files
  

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Review: Successful Television Writing

User Review  - Melissa - Goodreads

Overall, this book has a lot of useful information and the exercises are excellent. The advice is fantastic as well. The only drawbacks are that it was drama-centric, totally leaving out comedies, and ... Read full review

Review: Successful Television Writing

User Review  - Goodreads

Overall, this book has a lot of useful information and the exercises are excellent. The advice is fantastic as well. The only drawbacks are that it was drama-centric, totally leaving out comedies, and ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction So You Want to Write for Television
1
1 Basic Preparation
7
2 What Is a TV Series?
13
3 The FourAct Structure
19
4 Telling a TV Story
23
5 The Spec Script
31
6 What to Spec?
35
7 The Name Is Morris William Morris
41
12 Your First Assignment
81
13 Weve Got a Few Notes
89
14 Am I There Yet?
99
15 Becoming Rob Petrie
107
16 Rewrites
115
17 Your Really Great Idea for a Show
125
18 Im a Professional Writer and Ive Got the Card to Prove It
129
Afterword
133

8 The Pitch
49
9 How to Read the Producers Mind
57
10 What to Pitch
65
11 Youve Got the Assignment Now What?
73
Appendices
137
About the Authors
209
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

LEE GOLDBERG and WILLIAM RABKIN are veteran "showrunners" whose executive producing credits include the long-running drama Diagnosis Murder and the action-adventure hit Martial Law. Their writing and producing credits also include SeaQuest 2032, Spenser: For Hire, Hunter, Baywatch, Sliders, The Cosby Mysteries, Monk, and Nero Wolfe, to name a few. Both are former journalists who covered the television industry for Newsweek, American Film, the San Francisco Chronicle, and the Los Angeles Times Syndicate, among others. In addition, Rabkin has directed episodes of Diagnosis Murder and has taught a popular television writing course at UCLA. Goldberg is also a mystery novelist (Beyond the Beyond, My Gun Has Bullets) and the author of a definitive book on television series development (Unsold TV Pilots). He has taught writing seminars in Seattle, Miami, Denver, and Edmonton, Canada.

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