American literary geographies: spacial practice and cultural production, 1500-1900

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University of Delaware Press, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 367 pages
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This interdisciplinary collection of essays explores intersections between geography and American literary history, from the earliest geographic chronicles of the New World to the massive geopolitical transformation of the 1890s. Foregrounding the unsteady nature of geographical boundaries, the physical and imaginary migrations that coexisted with literary nationalisms, and changing attitudes toward geographical settings, these essays present alternatives to exceptionalist accounts of U.S. culture. The focus on literary and discursive settings addresses social and political developments such as imperialism, regionalism, and tourism. This book contributes to literary histories by emphasizing spatial over temporal frameworks as organizing principles or telling the story of American literature.

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Contents

List of Illustrations
7
Geographical Horizons
18
Cultural Geography
29
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Martin Bruckner is associate professor of English at the University of Delaware.

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