A Glossary, Or, Collection of Words, Phrases, Names and Allusions to Customs, Proverbs, Etc: Which Have Been Thought to Require Illustration, in the Works of English Authors, Particularly Shakespeare and His Contemporaries (Google eBook)

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J.R. Smith, 1867 - English language
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Page 260 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid, on a dolphin's back, Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song ; And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Page 283 - Our nation," says Sir Henry Blount, in the preface to a collection of some of Lyly's dramatic pieces which he published in 1632, " are in his debt for a new English which he taught them. Euphues and his England...
Page 235 - Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing, And like enough thou know'st thy estimate: The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing; My bonds in thee are all determinate. For how do I hold thee but by thy granting? And for that riches where is my deserving? The cause of this fair gift in me is wanting, And so my patent back again is swerving. Thyself thou...
Page 271 - His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Page 82 - Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry 'Hold, hold!
Page 225 - For he is not a man, as I am, that I should answer him, And we should come together in judgment. Neither is there any daysman betwixt us, That might lay his hand upon us both.
Page 231 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods...
Page iv - The Glossary of Archdeacon Nares is by far the best and most useful work we possess for explaining and illustrating the obsolete language and the customs and manners of the 16th and 17th Centuries, and it is quite indispensable for the readers of the literature of the Elizabethan period.
Page 467 - Thus most invectively he pierceth through The body of the country, city, court, Yea, and of this our life : swearing, that we Are mere usurpers, tyrants, and what's worse, To fright the animals, and to kill them up, In their assign'd and native dwelling-place.
Page 339 - For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe: You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine, And all for use of that which is mine own. Well, then, it now appears you need my help: Go to, then; you come to me, and you say, Shylock, we would have moneys...

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