Reminiscences of the Early Bench and Bar of Illinois (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Chicago Legal News Company, 1879 - Courts - 406 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 287 - Man that is born of a woman Is of few days, and full of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down : He fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not.
Page 421 - And Paul said, I would to GOD, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds.
Page 244 - Teach me to feel another's woe, To hide the fault I see; That mercy I to others show, That mercy show to me.
Page 223 - So loth we part from all we love, From all the links that bind us; So turn our hearts, as on we rove, To those we've left behind us! When, round the bowl, of vanished years We talk with joyous seeming, With smiles, that might as well be tears, So faint, so sad their beaming...
Page 38 - ... he was a man of great drollery, and it would almost make you laugh to look at him. I never saw but one other man whose quiet, droll look excited in me the same disposition to laugh, and that was Artemas Ward. He was quite a story-teller, and in this Abe resembled his Uncle Mord, as we all called him.
Page 229 - Remember, that for the wisest and most evident reasons, the merciful maxim of the law, which says that it is better that ninety-nine guilty men should escape, than that one innocent man should be punished...
Page 27 - When lovely woman stoops to folly, And finds too late that men betray, What charm can soothe her melancholy, What art can wash her guilt away ? The only art her guilt to cover, To hide her shame from every eye, To give repentance to her lover, And wring his bosom is to die.
Page 37 - I had known from my boyhood, and he was naturally a man of considerable genius; he was a man of great drollery, and it would almost make you laugh to look at him. I never saw but one other man whose quiet, droll look excited in me the same disposition to laugh, and that was Artemus Ward. He was quite a story-teller, and in this Abe resembled his Uncle Mord, as we called him.

Bibliographic information