Code 2.0

Front Cover
CreateSpace, Dec 30, 2009 - Computers - 426 pages
0 Reviews
Lawrence Lessig's "Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace" v1 quickly began to define a certain vocabulary for thinking about the regulation of cyberspace. More than any other social space, cyberspace would be controlled or not depending upon the architecture, or "code," of that space. And that meant regulators, and those seeking to protect cyberspace from at least some forms of regulation, needed to focus not just upon the work of legislators, but also the work of technologists.Code version 2.0 updates the original work. It is not, as Lessig writes in the preface, a "new work." The aim of the update was to recast the argument in the current context, and to clarify the argument where necessary. While Lessig himself has strong views about preserving important liberties that cyberspace originally protected, this book does not push any particular set of values. Unlike Lessig's other books, The Future of Ideas, and Free Culture, this book has no particular political agenda. Instead, the objective of Code is to introduce and defend a particular way of understanding regulation, and to describe the trend that we should expect regulation in cyberspace to take.Code v2 is published under the terms of the CC Attribution-ShareAlike license. Money raised from the sale of this book supports the development of free software and documentation.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

About the author (2009)

Lawrence "Larry" Lessig (born June 3, 1961) is an American academic and political activist. He is best known as a proponent of reduced legal restrictions on copyright, trademark, and radio frequency spectrum, particularly in technology applications.He is a director of the Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics at Harvard University and a professor of law at Harvard Law School. Prior to rejoining Harvard, he was a professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of its Center for Internet and Society. Lessig is a founding board member of Creative Commons, a board member of the Software Freedom Law Center and a former board member of the Electronic Frontier Foundation.In computer science, "code" typically refers to the text of a computer program (i.e., source code). In law, "code" can refer to the texts that constitute statutory law. In his book Code, Lessig explores the ways in which code in both senses can be instruments for social control, leading to his dictum that "Code is law".

Bibliographic information