The Origin of Freemasonry: The 1717 Theory Exploded (Google eBook)

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W. Reeves, 1871 - 61 pages
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Page 19 - I know not what effect the sight of this old paper may have upon your lordship ; but, for my own part, I cannot deny that it has so much raised my curiosity as to induce me to enter myself into the fraternity, which I am determined to do (if I may be admitted), the next time I go to London, and that will be shortly. I am, my lord, Your lordship's most obedient, And most humble servant, JOHN LOCKE.
Page 40 - The first charge is, That yee shall be true men to God and the holy church, and to use no error or heresie by your understanding and by wise men's teaching. Allso...
Page 42 - Fellows truely. And that no Master or Fellow supplant others of their worke; that is to say, that if he hath taken a worke, or else stand Master of any worke, that he shall not put him out, unless he be unable of cunning to make an end of...
Page 17 - I HAVE at length, by the help of Mr. Collins, procured a copy of that MS. in the Bodleian library, which you were so curious to see: and, in obedience to your lordship's commands, Therewith send it to you.
Page 17 - Henry VI. Where that prince had it, is at present an uncertainty; but it seems to me to be an examination (taken perhaps before the king) of some one of the brotherhood of Masons; among whom he entered himself, as it is said, when he came out of his minority, and thenceforth put a stop to a persecution that had been raised against them; but I must not detain your lordship longer, by my preface, from the thing itself.
Page 22 - Order, whom the candidates present with gloves, and so likewise to their wives, and entertain with a collation, according to the custom of the place : this ended, they proceed to the admission of them, which chiefly consists in the communication of certain secret signs, whereby they are known to one another all over the nation...
Page 63 - Arms and Armour, in Antiquity and the Middle Ages; also a Descriptive Notice of Modern Weapons. Translated from the French of MP LACOMBE, and with a Preface, Notes, and One Additional Chapter on Arms and Armour in England, by CHARLES BOUTELL, MA, Author of "English Heraldry.
Page 63 - LACOMBE. With a Preface, Notes, and an additional Chapter on Arms and Armour in England. A New Edition. With numerous added Illustrations of fine specimens from the collections of Sir Noel Paton, Lord Zouche, Windsor Castle, &c.
Page 42 - That every Master Mason and Fellow that hath trespassed against the Craft shall stand to the correction of other Masters and Fellows to make him accord, and if they cannot accord, to go to the common law.

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