French and English Philosophers: Descartes, Rousseau, Voltaire, Hobbes (Google eBook)

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Easton Press, 1910 - Philosophy - 434 pages
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Page 307 - For what is the heart but a spring, and the nerves but so many strings, and the joints but so many wheels, giving motion to the whole body, such as was intended by the artificer...
Page 144 - No traveller returns, — puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of ? Thus, conscience does make cowards of us all ; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought ; And enterprises of great pith and moment, With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.
Page 143 - tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die, to sleep...
Page 143 - tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die: to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil...
Page 79 - I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance; but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear; he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire...
Page 332 - But whatsoever is the object of any man's appetite or desire, that is it which he for his part calleth good: and the object of his hate and aversion, evil; and of his contempt, vile and inconsiderable. For these words of good, evil, and contemptible, are ever used with relation to the person that useth them : there being nothing simply and absolutely so ; nor any common rule of good and evil, to be taken from the nature of the objects themselves...
Page 378 - And as to the faculties of the mind, setting aside the arts grounded upon words, and especially that skill of proceeding upon general, and infallible rules, called science; which very few have, and but in few things...
Page 296 - Is it possible that a book, at once so simple and sublime, should be merely the work of man ? Is it possible that the sacred personage, whose history it contains, should be himself a mere man?
Page 382 - And consequently it is a precept, or general rule of reason, " that every man ought to endeavour peace, as far as he has hope of obtaining it ; and when he cannot obtain it, that he may seek and use all helps and advantages of war.
Page 143 - The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes...

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