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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on Immodest words admit of no defence; For want of decency is want of sense..  
" Immodest words admit of no defence; For want of decency is want of sense. "
Poetical Works: With the Life of the Author - Page 23
by Samuel Butler, Samuel Johnson - 1807
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Poems by the Earl of Roscommon: To which is Added, An Essay on Poetry

Wentworth Dillon Earl of Roscommon, John Sheffield Duke of Buckingham, Richard Duke - English poetry - 1717 - 536 pages
...Bait* Habitual Innocence adorns her Thoughts, But your Negleft muft anfwer for her Faults. Imntodeft Words admit of no Defence ; For want of 'Decency, is want of Senje, What mod'rate Fop wou'd rake the Tark, or Stews, Who among Troops of faultlefs Nymphs may Variety...
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The poetical works of ... Wentworth Dillon, earl of Roscommon

Wentworth Dillon (4th earl of Roscommon.) - 1749
...Habitual innocence adoms her thoughts, But your neglect muft anfwer for her faults. Immodeft Ľ Immodeft words admit of no defence ; For want of decency, is want of fenfe. What mod'rate fop would rake the park, or flews, Who among troops of faultlefs nymphs may chufe...
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The Odes, Epodes, and Carmen seculare of Horace, Volume 1

Literary Criticism - 1760
...Speech The Apartment of the tender Youth to reach. And alfo that of the great Rofcomon з Immode▀ Words admit of no Defence^ For Want of Decency is Want of Senfe. The Ellipfes neceflary to conneÚt the Senfe of the Author are very few, and printed in Italics....
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Political Register and Impartial Review of New Books

1768
...ignorance, or his obicenity. He has certainly verified the provefbial maxim of a great Writer : " Immodeft words admit of no defence, " For want of decency is want of ienfe." 3 he Dottrine of Inflammations, founded upon Rcafon and Experience, and entirely cleared from...
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The Political Register, and Impartial Review of New Books, Volume 3

John Almon - 1768
...or his obfcenity. He has certainly verified the proverbial maxim of a great writer : , .," Immodeft words admit of no defence, " For want of decency is want of fenfe." 7 he Dofirine of Inflammations, founded upon Reafon and Experience, and entirely cleared from...
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London review of English and foreign literature

William Kenrick - Bibliography - 1776
...licentious language, there is a palpable want of tafle and propriety in it. Our poet himfelf fays, ]mmodeft words admit of no defence, For want of decency is want of fenfe. This editor may contend as long as he pleafes for the privilege of the poet's profeilion, and...
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The Complete Letter-writer: Containing Familiar Letters on the Most Common ...

Business & Economics - 1778 - 249 pages
...never encouraged but in the company of fools ; fince, as my Lord Rofcommon juftly oblerves : " Immodelt words admit of no defence; " For want of decency. is want of fenfe.. I am, dear fon, Your truly affectionate father. LETTER XIII. The following letter .was .written...
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The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and ..., Volume 9

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1779
...bait, Habitual innocence adorns her thoughts, But your negleft muft anfwer for her faults. Immodeft words admit of no defence ; For want of decency is want of fenfe. What moderate fop would rake the Park or ftews, Who among troops of faultlefs nymphs may choofe...
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English etymology; or, A derivative dictionary of the English language

George William Lemon - 1783
...and ears, but even the thoughts and imaginations too, ought to be kept pure and untainted : Immodeil words admit of no defence ; For want of decency is want of fenfe *. Readers of fuch a cail ought to be fent to writers of a fimilar difpofition ; and indeed there...
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English Etymology

George William Lemon - English language - 1783 - 693 pages
...and ears, but even the thoughts and imaginations too, ought to be kept pure and untainted : Immodeil words admit of no defence ; For want of decency is want of fenfe *. Readers of fuch a cart ought to be fent to writers of a fimilar difpoiition ,- and indeed...
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