The Weather and Climate of Chicago (Google eBook)

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Geographic Society of Chicago, 1914 - Chicago (Ill.) - 375 pages
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Page 368 - ... houses broke the wind and caused a back current at the base of the buildings. As soon as the fire had thus got a new swath of houses before it, and the wind behind it, away it went tearing, thus sadly surprising many who were congratulating themselves because the first rush of flame had spared them. The Tribune people thought the strength of their building had saved them, because it lay at the extremity of one of the swaths. The next one took it. In the north division the first rush of the fire...
Page 368 - ... in all directions. Within forty yards of the blaze I estimated the wind blowing from the east toward it at thirty miles per hour. This caused a decided whirling motion in the column of flame and smoke, which was contrary to the hands of a watch. Blazing pieces of timber of considerable size were now whirled aloft and carried to the north-northeast, starting new fires as they fell. These new fires being in the line of the smoke were invisible to those at the old fire. One of the fires was on the...
Page 33 - ... successive seven days which may occur in the year. For this purpose the monthly normals have been extended to normals available for each day of the year. In the case of the temperature this was accomplished by plotting down on a large sheet the monthly normals, drawing a curve through the twelve points representing the months, and then scaling off the temperature for each day. The monthly means were then taken from these values, and in case of any discrepancy between these monthly means and the...
Page 112 - This map shows the average number of days between the last killing frost in the spring and the first in the fall for twelve years, 1899 to 1910.
Page xxiv - That which we call weather is only one phase in the succession of phenomena whose complete cycle, recurring with greater or less uniformity every year, constitutes the climate of any locality.
Page 367 - ... had become so intense as greatly to increase the power of the wind in the immediate neighborhood of the flames. This was especially the case on the east and west of the fire toward the front, the wind blowing straight toward the fire in all directions. Within forty yards of the blaze I estimated the wind blowing from the east toward it at thirty miles per hour. This caused a decided whirling motion in the column of flame and smoke, which was contrary to the hands of a watch. Blazing pieces of...
Page 369 - ... water stopped, doing nothing. At length they saw what they could do, and confined themselves to that. Letting the fire have free scope to the north and east, they endeavored to prevent it from spreading south against the wind. In this they succeeded, cutting it off just as it was preparing to lay hold of immense piles of lumber which lay along the river. This was done about 3 am Monday.
Page 368 - The city having thus been divided in two by a sheet of flame, the fire continued to work its way more leisurely to the east and west at right angles to the wind, as well as right in the teeth of it. The fire on the night of the 7th alone saved the west division. It had burned two blocks in breadth down the west side of the river. The fire on the 8th originated only a few blocks further south, hence it could not progress north for want of material.
Page 371 - It was as follows : CHICAGO, November 8, 1870 Noon. A high wind all day yesterday at Cheyenne and Omaha. A very high wind reported this morning at Omaha. Barometer falling, with high wind at Chicago and Milwaukee to-day. Barometer rising and thermometer rising at Chicago, Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, Buffalo, and Rochester. High winds probable along the lakes.
Page 369 - ... once burst into a blaze. To talk of fireproof buildings in the midst of such a furnace is absurd. Steel was melted in innumerable cases, and stones and brick were burned to powder. The firemen at first endeavored to check the fire in front. As soon as the fire had gathered in force this was not even to be thought of; not a single drop of water could reach the fire. The wind swept it aloft ; besides, the firemen had to look out. Several of the engines which went to the front at first got burnt...

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