Tales and Traditions of the Eskimo: With a Sketch of Their Habits, Religion, Language and Other Peculiarities (Google eBook)

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W. Blackwood and Sons, 1875 - Eskimos - 472 pages
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Contents

Kagsagsuk
93
The Blind Man who recovered his Sight
99
Igimarasugsuk
106
Avigiatsiak
107
The Birds Cliff
108
Kumagdlat and Asalok
109
An Angakok on Kekertarsuak
110
Singajuk and his Descendants
111
The Cousins
112
Akigsiak
116
The Friends
119
Katerparsuk
124
A Tale about Two Girls
126
The Brothers visit their Sister
128
Kunuk the Orphan Boy
132
The Faithless Wife
143
The Man who mated himself with a Seafowl
145
The Barren Wife
148
The Two Brothers
154
Giviok
157
Tiggak
162
MalaiseThe Man who travelled to Akilinek
169
Navaranak or Javniganak
174
Avarunguak or Agdlerut
177
The Girl who married an Atliarusek
183
The Lost Daughter
186
Angutisugsuk
189
Sitliamat
193
The Reindeerhunt of Merkisalik
197
Namak
202
The Lonely Brothers
208
Sikutluk
214
The Girl who fled to the Inlanders
217
The Orphans
221
The Girl who went away in search of her Hrother
224
The Dog
227
The Widows Vengeance
228
A Lamentable Story
232
y34 Uvikiak
233
The Sun and the Moon
236
Nivnitak
238
The Brother who went to Akilinek in search of his Sister
248
Ussungussak or Savnimersok
255
The Childmonster
258
The Kivigtok
260
The Woman who got connected with the Ingnersuit or Under world People
262
About the Children of Two Cousins
264
The Girl who was stolen by an Inlander
265
44 The Child that was stolen by the Inlanders
268
The Angakoks Flight to Akilinek
270
The Kayakers in Captivity with the Malignant Ingnersuit
278
The Orphan Boy Iliarsorkik
281
The Brothers who were lost on their Journey up the Fiord
286
The Solitary Kayaker
288
Kasiagsak the Great Liar
291
The Revived who came to the Underworld People
298
The Old Bachelor
300
Salik the Kivigtok
302
Stories about the Ancient Kavdlunait I Ungortok the Chief of Kakortok
308
Inugtujusok
337
The Sons who avenged their Mother
341
Ernersiak the Fosterson
346
The Old Southlander 351
351
Naujarsuak and Kukajak
354
The Two Friends rescued by the Benevolent Ingnersuit
358
The Strong Man on the Island of Kerka
361
Niakunguak
362
Augpilagtok
366
The Angakok Ataitsiak practising his Art with the Benevo lent Ingnersuit
370
The Strong Man on Umanak
373
Kigutikak carried off by the Whalers
376
The Man not to be looked at by the Europeans
385
73 The Angakok from Kakortok
389
Utereetsoks Journey to the Far North
392
Savanguak
396
Inuarutligakwhose Christian name was Peter Rantholl
400
Akutak and Inuinak
404
7S Arnarsarsuak the Kivigtok Woman
410
Avatarsuak who was baptised Nathan
414
About the Men from the Firth visiting the People at the open Seashore
418
The Deserted Woman and her Fosterdaughter
420
Isigarsigak
424
S3 Atalianguak
427
A Visit to the Giants 428 S 85 Kagsuk
431
The Dream and Conversion of Akamalik
434
Sangiak or Nerngajorak
437
8S Atlunguak
438
The Anghiak
439
The MoonKanak 440
440
A Barren Wife
441
The Woman who wanted to be a Man
442
An Angakok Flight
443
95 Kanginguak
444
A Man living on Karusuk
445
Atarsuatsiak
446
Atungak a Tale from Labrador
447
Malarsuak a Story from East Greenland
448
A Tale from Labrador
449
The Kidnappers
450
Manik
454
The Land of the Isarukitsok Bird 115 Kakortuliak
455
The Kuinasarinook 117 An Old Man who was always anxious to outdo other Peopl ll8 The Revenging Animals
456
The Igdlokok
457
Iviangersook travelled all around the Coast of Greenland 121 A Married Couple remained Childless on account of their both being Angakok
458
An Old Man lost his only Son
459
Angakorsiak was very proud of his Angakok Wisdom 124 A Girl named Tuagtuanguak
460
The Gifts from the Underworld 126 The Tupilak
461
W27 The Grateful Bear 128 The Inhabitants of Akilinek 129 The Mother and Son as Kivigtut
462
The Help from Ingnersuit
463
The Removal of Disco Island
464
The Aniarok 133 An Old Bachelor
465
A Girl named Isserlik 135 The Sunrise 136 The Amarkuagsak 137 Saugak
466
The Bloody Rock
467
Isigarsigak and his Sister 140 A Woman named Arnasugaussak 141 A Tale from East Greenland 142 Another Tale from East Greenland
468
The Swimmer a Tale from Labrador 144 The Natives of Labrador
469
The Shark as Provider 146 A Woman named Alekakukiak
470
The Oceanspider 148 A Woman who was mated with a D
471
Ordlavarsuk
472

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 29 - Looking at what has been said regarding the rights of property and the division of the people into certain communities, in connection with the division of property into the classes just given, we are led to the conclusion that the right of any individual to hold more than a certain amount of property was, if not regulated by law, at least jealously watched by the rest of the community, and that virtually the surplus of any individual or community, fixed by the arbitrary rate which tradition or custom...
Page 95 - That day Kagsagsuk ran all the way back, kicking the stones right and left, as was his wont. But at home he went on as usual, and the people tormented him more than ever. One day, in the autumn, the Kayakers returned home with a large piece of driftwood, which they only made fast to some large stones on the beach, finding it too heavy to be carried up to the house at once. At nightfall, Kagsagsuk said to his mother, 'Let me have thy boots, mother, that I too may go down and have a look at the large...
Page 96 - She did not like it much, but, however, she threw her boots to him, saying, "Then fetch me a skin for my couch, and another for my coverlet in return." He took the boots, fastened his ragged clothes around him, and then was off for the bears. Those who were standing outside cried, "Well, if that is not Kagsagsuk...
Page 37 - After death, human souls either go to the upper or to the under world. The latter is decidedly to be preferred, as being warm and rich in food. There are the dwellings of the happy dead called orsissut viz., those who live in abundance.
Page 67 - I'll call them all to me and give them u good thrashing with a big rope's end.
Page 95 - Let me have thy boots, mother, that I too may go down and have a look at the large piece of timber.' When all had gone to rest, he slipped out of the house, and having reached the beach, and loosened the moorings, he flung the piece of timber on his shoulders and carried it up behind the house, where he buried it deep in the ground. In the morning, when the first of the men came out, he cried, 'The driftwood is gone!' and when he was joined by the rest, and they saw the strings cut, they wondered...
Page 127 - ... to deliver their sister; but when the boat was finished it could not match a bird in speed, and was therefore broken to pieces, and another begun. This boat proved a match for a flying bird, but was nevertheless discarded, and they again built a new one, in which they tried to overtake a gull; and on finding that this one even outdid the bird, they started from home to fetch back their sister. On becoming aware of their approach she loosened the cord that held her, and twisting it round the stone,...
Page 93 - There was once a poor orphan boy who lived among a lot of uncharitable men. His name was Kagsagsuk, and his fostermother was a miserable old woman. These poor people had a wretched little shed adjoining the house-passage, and they were not allowed to enter the main room. Kagsagsuk did not even venture to enter the shed, but lay in the passage, seeking to warm himself among the dogs. In the morning, when the men were rousing their sledge-dogs with their whips, they often hit the poor boy as well as...
Page 97 - There is one for thy couch, and another for thy coverlet!" after which he ordered the flesh of the bears to be dressed and cooked. Kagsagsuk was now requested to enter the main room, in answer to which request he, as was his want, only peeped above the threshold, saying, "I really can't get across, unless some one will lift me up by the nostrils;" but nobody else venturing to do so now, his old foster-mother came and lifted him up as he desired. All the men had now become very civil to him. One would...
Page 45 - But a slain man is said to have power to avenge himself upon the murderer by rushing into him, which can only be prevented by eating a piece of his liver.

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