Walden Two (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Hackett Publishing, 1974 - Psychology - 320 pages
26 Reviews
This fictional outline of a modern utopia has been a center of controversy ever since its publication in 1948. Set in the United States, it pictures a society in which human problems are solved by a scientific technology of human conduct.
  

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5 stars
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4 stars
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3 stars
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2 stars
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I was bored, despite the brisk pace. - Goodreads
It even supplies research ideas. - Goodreads
There is no discernible plot whatsoever. - Goodreads

Review: Walden Two

User Review  - Nathan Titus - Goodreads

an appalling vision of a utopia. Unlike most utopia visions, however, this one is completely honest. It's not about making a "perfect society;" it's about controlling the members. The perfect society ... Read full review

Review: Walden Two

User Review  - Loretta - Goodreads

Awesome concept!! I gave it 4 stars not for its literary value but for the book's exploration of the utopian ideal based on careful behavior modification. Each new concept controlled by the character ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter 2
8
Chapter 3
15
Chapter 4
23
Chapter 5
28
Chapter 6
34
Chapter 7
40
Chapter 8
45
Chapter 9
60
Chapter 20
146
Chapter 21
167
Chapter 22
172
Chapter 23
179
Chapter 24
191
Chapter 25
197
Chapter 26
203
Chapter 27
208

Chapter 10
68
Chapter 11
77
Chapter 12
86
Chapter 13
91
Chapter 14
95
Chapter 15
107
Chapter 16
119
Chapter 17
128
Chapter 18
138
Chapter 19
142
Chapter 28
227
Chapter 29
236
Chapter 30
261
Chapter 31
264
Chaper 32
267
Chapter 33
277
Chapter 34
283
Chapter 35
286
Chapter 36
298
Copyright

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About the author (1974)

Burrhus Frederic Skinner (19041990), regarded by many as the most important and influential psychologist since Freud, earned his doctorate in psychology at Harvard University in 1931. Following appointments at the University of Minnesota and Indiana University, he returned to Harvard in 1948. He remained there for the rest of his career, retiring in 1974 as Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology.

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