Women of Brewster Place: 2

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Viking Press, 1982 - Fiction - 192 pages
25 Reviews
Once the home of poor Irish and Italian immigrants, Brewster Place, a rotting tenement on a dead-end street, now shelters black families. This novel portrays the courage, the fear, and the anguish of some of the women there who hold their families together, trying to make a home. Among them are: Mattie Michael, the matriarch who loses her son to prison; Etta Mae Johnson who tries to trade the 'high life' for marriage with a local preacher; Kiswana Browne who leaves her middle-class family to organize a tenant's union.

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Review: The Women of Brewster Place

User Review  - Laura - Goodreads

This is a great book, with the exception of the ending. It was anti-climactic, and it didn't provide any closure for the reader. I understand that the author was being symbolic, but the effect was ... Read full review

Review: The Women of Brewster Place

User Review  - Danielle Franco-Malone - Goodreads

I seriously loved this book of interconnected short stories about women whose lives eventually bring them to the same low income housing development. One of the best books about race I've read ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
7
Section 3
55
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Gloria Naylor is an African American novelist and educator. She was born on January 25, 1950 in New York City. She attended Medgar Evans College, Brooklyn College of CUNY and Yale University. Naylor has taught at institutions such as George Washington University, the University of Pennsylvania, New York University, Princeton University, and Boston University. After reading the novelist Toni Morrison, Naylor was compelled to become a writer and composed The Women of Brewster Place, which received the American Book Award for Best First Novel and became a film in 1989.

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