Aeschylus: The Persians. Seven against Thebes. The Suppliants. Prometheus bound

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University of Pennsylvania Press, Dec 1, 1998 - Drama - 224 pages
3 Reviews
This final volume of the tragedies of Aeschylus relates the historic defeat and dissolution of the Persian Empire on the heels of Xerxes disastrous campaign to subdue Greece, the struggle between the two sons of Oedipus for the throne of Thebes, the story of fifty daughters who seek asylum from their uncle, the king of Egypt, because of his demand that they marry his sons, and the well-known tale of the proud and unrepentant Prometheus, who is chained to a massive rock for revealing fire and hope to humankind.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

With an Introduction to each of three plays by Aeschylus. The Suppliant Maidens is the earliest Greek play still preserved, and was produced circa 490 BC. 50 daughters of Danaus flee from Egypt to ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gmicksmith - LibraryThing

One of the most classic collections of the best of the Greeks. Prometheus Bound and The Persians are top notch.Seven Against Thebes adds to Antigone in particular. Anything that remains of Aeschylus is priceless. Read full review

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About the author (1998)

David R. Slavitt was born in White Plains, New York in 1935. He received an AB and an MA from Columbia University. After graduating from college and beginning a Ph.D., he worked as a movie critic for Newsweek from the late 1950s through the mid-1960s. During this time, he published his first book of poetry, Suits for the Dead. His first novel, Rochelle, or Virtue Rewarded, was published in 1966. He has written about 100 works of fiction, poetry, and poetry and drama in translation including Alice at 80, The Cock Book, Falling from Silence: Poems, The Latin Odes of Jean Dorat, Milton's Latin Poems, and Three Greenlandic Poets. He also writes under the names David Benjamin, Henry Lazarus, Lynn Meyer, and Henry Sutton. As Henry Sutton, he has written less "literary" works that have sold well such as The Exhibitionist and The Sacrifice: A Novel of the Occult.

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