Writings/Interviews

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University of Chicago Press, Aug 15, 1994 - Architecture - 280 pages
2 Reviews
One of the most important sculptors of this century, Richard Serra has been a spokesman on the nature and status of art in our day. Best known for site-specific works in steel, Serra has much to say about the relation of sculpture to place, whether urban, natural, or architectural, and about the nature of art itself, whether political, decorative, or personal. In interviews with writers including Douglas and Davis Sylvester, he discusses specific installations and offers insights into his approach to the problem each presents. Interviews by Peter Eisenman and Alan Colquhoun elicit Serra's thoughts on the relation of architecture to contemporary sculpture, a primary component in his own work. From essays like "Extended Notes from Sight Point Road" to Serra's extended commentary on the Tilted Arc fiasco, the pieces in this volume comprise a document of one artist's engagement with the practical, philosophical, and political problems of art.
  

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Writings, interviews

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The removal of Serra's Tilted Arc from Federal Plaza in New York City was one of the seminal events in recent art censorship history, particularly because the controversy focused strictly on the ... Read full review

Review: Writings/Interviews

User Review  - Greg - Goodreads

Love this man of steel! It's nice to know pure artists are still alive and kicking. You'll want to map out all the work and take a Serra-only trip to NYC. Read full review

Contents

II
3
III
7
IV
11
V
15
VI
19
VII
27
VIII
35
IX
51
XVII
157
XVIII
167
XIX
175
XX
177
XXI
183
XXII
187
XXIII
193
XXIV
215

X
61
XI
97
XII
103
XIII
111
XIV
119
XV
125
XVI
141
XXV
225
XXVI
229
XXVII
247
XXVIII
253
XXIX
263
XXX
271
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About the author (1994)

Richard Serra was born in San Francisco in 1939. While in college, he supported himself by working in steel mills. His work, which stems from minimalist beginnings in the 60s and has been exhibited and permanently installed around the world, is famous for a physicality compounded by breathtaking size and weight. Serra lives in New York and Nova Scotia.

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