Biography and history of the Indians of North America: comprising a general account of them, and details in the lives of all the most distinguished chiefs, and others who have been noted, among the various Indian nations ... Also, a history of their wars; their manners and customs; and the most celebrated speeches of their orators ... Likewise exhibiting an analysis of the ... authors who have written upon ... the first peopling of America ..., Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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O.L. Perkins, 1834 - Indians of North America - 541 pages
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Page 79 - BROTHER : The Great Spirit has made us all, but He has made a great difference between his white and red children. He has given us different complexions and different customs. To you He has given the arts. To these He has not opened our eyes. We know these things to be true. Since He has made so great a difference between us in other things, why may we not conclude that He has given us a different religion according to our understanding ? The Great Spirit does right He knows what is best for his...
Page 79 - Brother, continue to listen. You say that you are sent! to instruct us how to worship the Great Spirit agreeably to his mind; and, if we do not take hold of the religion which you white people teach we shall be unhappy hereafter. You say that you are right and we are lost. How do we know this to be true?
Page 79 - Brother! We do not understand these things. We are told that your religion was given to your forefathers, and has been handed down from father to son. We also have a religion which was given to our forefathers, and has been handed down to us their children. We worship that way.
Page 101 - The way, and the only way, to check and to stop this evil, is for all the red men to unite in claiming a common and equal right in the land, as it was at first, and should be yet; for it never was divided, but belongs to all for the use of each. That no part has a right to sell, even to each other, much less to strangers; those who want all, and will not do with less.
Page 6 - ... having feasted him after their best barbarous manner they could, a long consultation was held, but the conclusion was, two great stones were brought before Powhatan: then as many as could...
Page 3 - I seized upon. They were all of one nation, but of several parts, and several families. This accident must be acknowledged the means, under God, of putting on foot and giving life to all our plantations.
Page 22 - ... is affectionate to his children, careful of them, and indulgent in the extreme; that his affections comprehend his other connections, weakening, as with us, from circle to circle, as they recede from the centre; that his friendships are strong and faithful to the uttermost extremity...
Page 45 - I LIKE IT WELL; I SHALL DIE BEFORE MY HEART IS SOFT, OR HAVE SAID ANY THING UNWORTHY OF MYSELF.
Page 28 - ... he intended to say, or has any thing to add, he may rise again, and deliver it. To interrupt another, even in common conversation, is reckoned highly indecent.
Page 12 - He said he could not give more than four shillings a pound: but, says he, I cannot talk on business now; this is the day when we meet together to learn good things, and I am going to the meeting.

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