Encyclopaedia britannica: a dictionary of arts, sciences, literature and general information, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Hugh Chisholm
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1910 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries
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Page 232 - ... is a general word for a shop, in low Latin. They appear, by the old statutes of the University of Paris, and by those of Bologna, to have sold books upon commission ; and are sometimes, though not uniformly, distinguished from the Librarii; a word which, having originally been confined to the copyists of books, was afterwards applied to those who traded in them. They sold parchment and other materials of writing, which with us, though, as far as I know, nowhere else, have retained the name of...
Page 44 - Stra. 834. the court would not suffer it to be debated, whether to write against Christianity was punishable in the temporal courts at common law? Wood, therefore, 409. ventures still to vary the phrase, and says " that all blasphemy and profaneness are offences by the common law,
Page 26 - Municipal law, thus understood, is properly defined to be a 'rule of civil conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state, commanding what is right and prohibiting what is wrong.
Page 160 - The Earl of Oxford was removed on Tuesday, " the Queen died on Sunday! What a world is " this, and how does Fortune banter us !" says Bolingbroke.* * Letter to Swift, Aug.
Page 189 - That he took the bill in good faith and for value, and that at the time the bill was negotiated to him he had no notice of any defect in the title of the person who negotiated it.
Page 42 - Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.
Page 115 - While Boethius, oppressed with fetters, expected each moment the sentence or the stroke of death, he composed, in the tower of Pavia, the Consolation of Philosophy ; a golden volume not unworthy of the leisure of Plato or Tully, but which claims incomparable merit from the barbarism of the times and the situation of the author.
Page 62 - Royal Normal College and Academy of Music for the Blind. Upper Norwood 1872 School for the Blind.
Page 44 - ... that if any person or persons having been educated in, or at any time having made profession of the christian religion within this realm, shall by writing, printing, teaching or advised speaking, deny any one of the persons of the Holy Trinity to be God, (repealed as to this part by 53 Geo.
Page 71 - Article 1. A blockade must not extend beyond the ports and coasts belonging to or occupied by the enemy. Art. 2. In accordance with the Declaration of Paris of 1856, a blockade, in order to be binding, must be effective, that is to say, it must be maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the enemy coastline.

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