The Centaur (Google eBook)

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pubOne info LLC, Sep 15, 2010 - Fiction - 231 pages
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-We may be in the Universe as dogs and cats are in our libraries, seeing the books and hearing the conversation, but having no inkling of the meaning of it all.- WILLIAM JAMES, A Pluralistic Universe -... A man's vision is the great fact about him. Who cares for Carlyle's reasons, or Schopenhauer's, or Spencer's? A philosophy is the expression of a man's intimate character, and all definitions of the Universe are but the deliberately adopted reactions of human characters upon it.- Ibid -There are certain persons who, independently of sex or comeliness, arouse an instant curiosity concerning themselves. The tribe is small, but its members unmistakable. They may possess neither fortune, good looks, nor that adroitness of advance-vision which the stupid name good luck; yet there is about them this inciting quality which proclaims that they have overtaken Fate, set a harness about its neck of violence, and hold bit and bridle in steady hands. -Most of us, arrested a moment by their presence to snatch the definition their peculiarity exacts, are aware that on the heels of curiosity follows envy.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - rocketjk - LibraryThing

Blackwood, a writer active in the late 1800s and early 1900s was best known for his collections of horror short stories. In this novel, though, he is delving into a sort of ecological mysticism. The ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Algernon Blackwood (1869-1951) trained as a doctor and took up a special interest in Eastern medicine and religion. He published several short story collections before becoming an undercover agent for Britain during World War I. After the war he became known for his regular appearances reading ghost stories on BBC radio and television.

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